community


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Related to community: Community Bank

community

 [kŏ-mu´nĭ-te]
a group of persons residing together in face-to-face association; a group of persons with whom an individual identifies as a source of identity and potential support.
continuing care community life care community.
life care community a living arrangement for older adults that provides several levels of care within one facility or complex. As the resident requires more health supervision, he or she moves from areas that are more independent to those where care is provided under the supervision of a registered nurse. Life care communities usually require an entry fee as well as a monthly fee. Called also continuing care community.
therapeutic community a specially structured mental treatment center, employing group and milieu therapy and encouraging the patient to function within social norms.

com·mu·ni·ty

(kŏ-myū'ni-tē),
A given segment of a society or a population.

community

/com·mu·ni·ty/ (-te) a body of individuals living in a defined area or having a common interest or organization.
biotic community  an assemblage of populations living in a defined area.
therapeutic community  a structured mental treatment center employing group and milieu therapy and encouraging the patient to function within social norms.

community

(kə-myo͞o′nĭ-tē)
n. pl. communi·ties
1.
a. A group of people living in the same locality and under the same government.
b. The district or locality in which such a group lives.
2.
a. A group of organisms interacting with one another and with the environment in a specific region.
b. The region occupied by a group of interacting organisms.

community

[kəmyo̅o̅′nitē]
Etymology: L, communis, common
1 a group of species who reside in a designated geographic area and who share common interests or bonds.
2 a person's natural environment, that is where the person works, plays, and performs other daily activities.

community

A specific group of people, often living in a defined geographical area, who share a common culture, values and norms, arranged in a social structure according to relationships, which the community has developed over a period of time.

com·mu·ni·ty

(kŏ-myūn'i-tē)
A group of people united by some common feature or shared interest; the social context in which professional services are provided. A community may be united by physical or geographic factors, by one or more common characteristics such as age, gender, developmental level, culture, or health or disability status, or by a shared perspective.
See also: community-based practice
[L. communitas, fellowship, fr. communis, common]

community

a naturally occurring group of different species of organisms that lives together and interacts as a selfcontained unit in the same habitat, relatively independent of inputs and outputs from adjacent communities. Ideally, it is selfcontained in terms of food relationships, and usually the only energy required from outside is that of the sun.

community

a group of individuals living in an area, having a common interest, or belonging to the same organization.

community adoption curve
graphic display of the rate at which persons in a community adopt new techniques and strategies.

Patient discussion about community

Q. is there a nurses community in this site?!

A. Here: http://www.imedix.com/Nurses.

Do you work as a nurse yourself? Do you have any special interest or questions about nursing?

Q. how do i join the nurses community?

A. Go to 'My stuff' and then click on 'add your health interests', then add the tag "Nurses" to 'my interests'.
Once you have added it, click on 'save changes'.

Q. Hi, I'm new to the ADHD community. I was very happy to hear about this site. Can anyone let me know how it works? How do I meet people who are dealing with ADHD?

A. I'm sorry to hear about your son Kavon. I actually know a lot of people that suffer from the same problem, but they are able to cope with it quite well.

More discussions about community
References in periodicals archive ?
The content, scientific process, pedagogy, community experience, and reasoned findings of my master's thesis nudged me into a new life stage as a researcher.
As a result, most of the technologies the S & T labs are working on will never be identified as meeting a requirement as defined by the user community.
Nevertheless, it can be argued that one of the main strengths of joint use libraries is their strong community emphasis.
The first is the local community of neighborly assistance, celebrated in working-class autobiographies for providing a security blanket for its members.
The starting point for these research projects is the recognition in the public health community that most human diseases are related in some manner to social factors and forces (Kaplan 1999; Link and Phelan 1995; Schulz et al.
The Wachovia CDFI Excellence Awards presented by the National Community Capital Association focus attention on those leaders in the field of community development who have demonstrated excellence in their efforts to service communities of opportunity.
Money problems for community colleges, as well as their students, are forcing both to buy into what can only be called "homeland security education.
In early 1994, Macomb formed a Crime and Quality of Life Advisory Committee, changing the name in 1996 to Community Quality of Life Committee and expanding the purview to include all of McDonough County.
School-family-community partnerships are collaborative initiatives or relationships among school personnel, parents, family members, community members, and representatives of community-based organizations such as businesses, churches, libraries, and social service agencies.
In order to examine the sense of community and rural community change, Salamon utilized a community ethnographic method supplemented by additional research methods, and she devised a typology to examine four community dimension indicators which consisted of (1) public space and place; (2) interconnections; (3) social resources; and (4) cross-age relations.

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