community

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community

 [kŏ-mu´nĭ-te]
a group of persons residing together in face-to-face association; a group of persons with whom an individual identifies as a source of identity and potential support.
continuing care community life care community.
life care community a living arrangement for older adults that provides several levels of care within one facility or complex. As the resident requires more health supervision, he or she moves from areas that are more independent to those where care is provided under the supervision of a registered nurse. Life care communities usually require an entry fee as well as a monthly fee. Called also continuing care community.
therapeutic community a specially structured mental treatment center, employing group and milieu therapy and encouraging the patient to function within social norms.

com·mu·ni·ty

(kŏ-myū'ni-tē),
A given segment of a society or a population.

community

/com·mu·ni·ty/ (-te) a body of individuals living in a defined area or having a common interest or organization.
biotic community  an assemblage of populations living in a defined area.
therapeutic community  a structured mental treatment center employing group and milieu therapy and encouraging the patient to function within social norms.

community

(kə-myo͞o′nĭ-tē)
n. pl. communi·ties
1.
a. A group of people living in the same locality and under the same government.
b. The district or locality in which such a group lives.
2.
a. A group of organisms interacting with one another and with the environment in a specific region.
b. The region occupied by a group of interacting organisms.

community

[kəmyo̅o̅′nitē]
Etymology: L, communis, common
1 a group of species who reside in a designated geographic area and who share common interests or bonds.
2 a person's natural environment, that is where the person works, plays, and performs other daily activities.

community

A specific group of people, often living in a defined geographical area, who share a common culture, values and norms, arranged in a social structure according to relationships, which the community has developed over a period of time.

com·mu·ni·ty

(kŏ-myūn'i-tē)
A group of people united by some common feature or shared interest; the social context in which professional services are provided. A community may be united by physical or geographic factors, by one or more common characteristics such as age, gender, developmental level, culture, or health or disability status, or by a shared perspective.
See also: community-based practice
[L. communitas, fellowship, fr. communis, common]

community

a naturally occurring group of different species of organisms that lives together and interacts as a selfcontained unit in the same habitat, relatively independent of inputs and outputs from adjacent communities. Ideally, it is selfcontained in terms of food relationships, and usually the only energy required from outside is that of the sun.

community

a group of individuals living in an area, having a common interest, or belonging to the same organization.

community adoption curve
graphic display of the rate at which persons in a community adopt new techniques and strategies.

Patient discussion about community

Q. is there a nurses community in this site?!

A. Here: http://www.imedix.com/Nurses.

Do you work as a nurse yourself? Do you have any special interest or questions about nursing?

Q. how do i join the nurses community?

A. Go to 'My stuff' and then click on 'add your health interests', then add the tag "Nurses" to 'my interests'.
Once you have added it, click on 'save changes'.

Q. Hi, I'm new to the ADHD community. I was very happy to hear about this site. Can anyone let me know how it works? How do I meet people who are dealing with ADHD?

A. I'm sorry to hear about your son Kavon. I actually know a lot of people that suffer from the same problem, but they are able to cope with it quite well.

More discussions about community
References in periodicals archive ?
Reflection: Linking service and learning--linking students and communities.
There is frequently finger-pointing among the three communities regarding who is responsible for articulating these early requirements.
Most of the librarians working in joint use libraries surveyed by Jaffe in the early 1980s noted the special contribution these libraries made to their communities (in Fitzgibbons, 2000).
The localized communities of working-class neighborhoods had been born in the late nineteenth century, and community life remained a central feature of these neighborhoods into the interwar period.
Such research requires the involvement of communities at multiple levels--not only to obtain better understanding of the concerns and issues of the communities but also to promote change by involving members of communities who live in these areas and are affected by these processes.
We congratulate them for contributing so much to their communities and to the future of our industry.
Many of today's crime prevention approaches are based on an experiment conducted in a New Jersey community years ago, which spotlighted the importance of maintaining neighborhoods to keep communities relatively crime free.
In spite of this drab picture, recent research on the successes of more than 4,500 high-performing, high-minority, and high-poverty schools should elicit the hope in educators that urban schools, families, and communities can work together to foster the educational resilience and academic success of students (Education Trust, 2001).
Salamon's discussion of "boosters" and "pro-growth coalitions" used as development tactics by the townspeople to attract economic development provides a discussion of political and economic factors often cited in the urban sociology literature and reinforces her argument that these six agrarian towns are changing from agrarian towns to post-agrarian communities.
The team began working with Asian-American communities to develop a culturally tailored intervention that 1) promoted community understanding of the facts related to the transmission and prevention of SARS; 2) contributed to the strengthening of community resiliency and capacity to mitigate fear, stigmatization, and discrimination; and 3) encouraged appropriate health-seeking behaviors for those who may have been exposed to SARS and were experiencing early symptoms.
The South Asian Network (SAN) has won the trust of their communities and provides ongoing assistance on a variety of areas, especially to newly arrived immigrants.
Information about specific needs of each of the participating 23 First Nations communities was gathered during Phase I.

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