commotio


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Related to commotio: commotio retinae, Commotio cerebri

con·cus·sion

(kon-kŭ'shŭn),
1. A violent shaking or jarring.
2. An injury of a soft structure, as the brain, resulting from a blow or violent shaking. Synonym(s): commotio
[L. concussio, fr. con- cutio, pp. -cussus, to shake violently]

commotio

A concussion; a violent shaking or “rattling” of the brain, or shock secondary thereto.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rare but often fatal condition, known as commotio cordis, occurs when children are struck by a baseball, softball, lacrosse ball, or other object within a critical split second in the heart cycle, triggering ventricular fibrillation.
Anterior segment Corneal abrasion 1 Hyphema 7 Iris sphincter rupture 3 Subluxated lens 2 Cataract 3 Vitreous prolapse into 1 anterior champer Posterior segment Vitreous hemorrhage 6 Commotio retinae 3 Choroidal rupture 1 TABLE 3 Surgical Procedures Procedure No.
According to US Lacrosse, at least five lacrosse players are believed to have died during competition as a result of SCA caused by commotio cordis since 1999, though it has afflicted many more people in a variety of organized athletic events, recreational play and non-sports activities.
Commotio cordis does not result solely from the force of a blow.
They studied commotio cordis using a swine model and a pitching machine to mimic the field conditions of baseball impacts.
She is also anxious to explain to me how she needs the services of a page-turning assistant who can also change registrations for her, and indicates passages in the score of Commotio where one would need at least three hands to encompass all the composer's colouristic and dynamic demands.
While the experts say the specific triggers of cardiac arrest in young adults are unclear, at least 120 cases of commotio cordis have been documented since the formation of the United States Commotio Cordis registry in 1998.
Nielsen's 22-minute organ piece Commotio, generally regarded as his final masterpiece, always presents problems in terms of coupling.
Death from commotio cordis or "concussion of the heart" is caused by disruption of the electrical activity in the heart muscle.
Nielsen enthusiasts will not want to miss a unique day on October 26 when his three final masterpieces - the Three Motets for unaccompanied choir, the Three Pieces for piano and the monumental organ piece Commotio - are all performed at a morning concert by Danish performers: the Copenhagen Royal Chapelle Choir, Anne Marie Abildskov and Grethe Krogh.
A special morning concert will feature his last three major compositions - the epic solo organ work Commotio (on Symphony Hall's newly installed organ), the Three Pieces for piano and the Three Motets for unaccompanied choir, all with Danish performers.