Vespula vulgaris

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Vespula vulgaris

(vĕs′pūl-ă vūl-gār′ĭs) [NL., common (little) wasp]
The scientific name for the yellow jacket. The yellow jacket is a black-and-yellow-striped stinging wasp whose venom, abbreviated Ves v by the World Health Organization, may cause anaphylaxis in susceptible individuals.
References in periodicals archive ?
So perhaps it's one of those, but it's certainly not a common wasp (Vespula vulgaris).
Common wasps, for it is they that launch wave after wave of aerial attacks on summer barbecues, are the one you're most likely to encounter, although other species do occur in the north west.
The list also includes the Mediterranean mussel, the common wasp, starlings, brown trout and mice.
It is bigger and more ferocious than the common wasp, much more aggressive.
The common wasp creates a `paper' nest from chewed wood pulp in holes in the ground or tree trunks, or the roofs of buildings.
In good news for picnickers, though, common wasps also had a poor year across much of southern England.