hypogammaglobulinemia

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hypogammaglobulinemia

 [hi″po-gam″ah-glob″u-lin-e´me-ah]
abnormally low levels of all classes of immunoglobulins, associated with heightened susceptibility to infectious diseases; see also agammaglobulinemia, dysglobulinemia, and immunodeficiency.
common variable hypogammaglobulinemia common variable immunodeficiency.
physiologic hypogammaglobulinemia a normal period of hypogammaglobulinemia seen in all infants at about 5–6 months of age as the level of transplacentally acquired maternal immunoglobulins declines before endogenous immunoglobulin synthesis rises to normal levels.
transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy prolongation of the normal physiologic hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy caused by delayed development of endogenous immunoglobulin production and associated with increased susceptibility to infections.
X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă),
Decreased quantity of the gamma fraction of serum globulin; sometimes used loosely to denote decreased quantity of immunoglobulins in general; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobinemia

hypogammaglobulinemia

/hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·emia/ (-gam″ah-glob″u-lĭ-ne´me-ah) deficiency of all classes of immunoglobulins, as in agammaglobulinemia, dysglobulinemia, and immunodeficiency. This is normal for a short period in infants but should not be prolonged.hypogammaglobuline´mic
common variable hypogammaglobulinemia  see under immunodeficiency.

hypogammaglobulinemia

[-gam′əglō′byəlinē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hypo + gamma, third letter in Greek alphabet; L, globus, small sphere; Gk, haima, blood
lower than normal concentration of plasma gamma globulin, usually the result of increased protein catabolism or loss of protein via the urine. It is associated with a decreased resistance to infection. Also spelled hypogammaglobulinaemia. Compare agammaglobulinemia.

hypogammaglobulinemia

Immunology A gallimaufry of conditions characterized by ↓ production of proteins, usually Igs, which migrate in the gamma region of a protein electrophoretic gel; hypogammaglobulinemia may be congenital, as in Bruton's disease, or other B-cell defects or acquired, as in CLL, and accompanied by monoclonal gammopathies Treatment Human immune globulin. See Immunodeficiency, B cell.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
Decreased gamma fraction of serum globulin; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobulinaemia.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
Decreased gamma fraction of serum globulin; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobulinaemia.

hypogammaglobulinemia (hī´pō-gam´əglob´ūlinē´mēə),

n a deficiency of gammaglobulin, usually manifested by recurrent bacterial infections.

hypogammaglobulinemia

an immunological deficiency state marked by abnormally low levels of generally all classes of immunoglobulins, with increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. It may be primary (called also inherited), or secondary (called also acquired), or it may be physiological. The latter occurs in normal neonates. See also agammaglobulinemia.
The young of most animal species are born hypogammaglobulinemic and remain so until they ingest maternal colostrum which has a high content of immunoglobulins. The ingestion must occur during the first 24-48 hours of life because the large molecules of the globulins are absorbed only during this period. Inadequate supply, or inadequate ingestion or absorption of the immunoglobulins results in prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia and puts the neonate at grave risk of life-threatening infections. This failure of passive antibody transfer is the most common immunodeficiency disease encountered in domestic animal species, especially foals and dairy calves.

transient hypogammaglobulinemia
occurs in some foals at 3 to 4 months of age because of a delayed onset of immunoglobulin synthesis.