Reed

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Related to common reed: Phragmites, Phragmites communis

Reed

 [rēd]
Walter (1851–1902). American bacteriologist, born in Gloucester County, Virginia. As a military physician, Reed was appointed during the Spanish–American War chief of a committee to investigate typhoid fever epidemic in the army camps. In 1899, when yellow fever was particularly severe in Cuba, he again was appointed chairman of a committee to study its method of transmission, and he proved by thorough experimentation that yellow fever was carried only by a certain species of mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

Reed

(rēd),
Dorothy M., U.S. pathologist, 1874-1964. See: Reed cell, Reed-Sternberg cell, Sternberg-Reed cell.

Reed

(rēd),
Walter, 1851-1902. U.S. Army surgeon, elucidated epidemiology of yellow fever. See: Reed-Frost model.

Reed, Pamela G.

a nursing theorist who developed the Self-Transcendence Theory. Self-transcendence is the expansion of a person's concept of self through introspection, interaction with other people and the surrounding environment, integration of the past and future, and spirituality. It is based on the belief that, to maintain a sense of well-being, older adults must continue their cognitive development during the process of aging.

reed

abomasum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vegetation of Aras river is comprised of Common reed, Tamarisk, Populus, Sedge distribute from terrestrial to riparian in suitable parts but Tamarisk and common reed is dominated in flooded, full of Potassium & Magnesium and having heavy metals respectively.
Species Percent Composition Frequency of [+ or -] SE Occurrence (%) Common reed 59.
Cryptic invasion by a non-native genotype of the common reed, Phragmites australis, into North America.
In recent years, areas of the site have been overrun by an invasive species of common reed called Phragmites australis, which is a problem because its roots can grow very thick and high, preventing tidewater from penetrating the area frequently.
In Finland the average yield of common reed is considered to be 5 t/ha per year (maximum 10-12 t) and the resource is 30 000 t/year, storage would require 3-4% of the produced energy [6].
Additional planting will be provided throughout the reserve, including common reed and yellow iris.
In the United States as in Europe, the common reed, Phragmites communis, is a popular species for dewatering waste-water sludge.
This resulted in changes in the composition of flora and fauna, enabling such non-native plants as the common reed (Phragmites) to invade the marsh.
The favored plant for reed beds in the UK is Phragmites australis, which is the common reed.
1~ of common reed canarygrass were transplanted into 20 cm (8 in) diameter pots containing an Edneytown fine sandy foam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapuldults), a common soil in the Blue Ridge Mountains.
Non-native types of common reed, which grow in wetlands and other moist sites, have also been proposed as Class "C" noxious weeds.