Saint John’s wort

(redirected from common St John’s wort)

Saint John’s wort

Fringe medicine
An essence which, in the pseudoscience of flower essence therapy, is said to provide a sense of consciousness, self-awareness and inner strength. 

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb containing flavonoids, glycosides, mucilage, tannins and volatile oil, which is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, astringent, expectorant and sedative; it has been used internally for arthritis, bed-wetting, bronchitis, colds, mental disorders (anxiety, depression, insomnia, nervousness), menstrual cramps, neuralgia, rheumatic pain and sciatica, and topically for burns, cuts and wounds. It was used transiently as a herbal therapy for AIDS.
 
Toxicity
St John’s wort has been deemed unsafe by the FDA, given its phototoxicity; it causes hypertension, headaches, nausea, and vomiting; it may interact with amphetamines, amino acids (tryptophan, tyrosine), anti-asthmatic inhalants, beer, wine, chocolate, coffee, fava beans, cold and hay fever medication, narcotics, nasal decongestants and smoked or pickled foods.