commensal

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Related to commensals: plankton, symbiosis

commensal

 [kŏ-men´sal]
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

/com·men·sal/ (kom-men´sil)
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host.
2. a parasite that causes no harm to the host.

commensal

(kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men′sal·ly adv.

commensal

[kəmen′səl]
Etymology: L, com, together, imensa, table
(two different species) living together in an arrangement that is not harmful to either and that may be beneficial to both. Some bacteria in the digestive tract of humans aid in the processing of food and produce B vitamins needed for normal health while causing no harm (normal flora). Compare parasite, synergist.

commensal

adjective Referring to a relationship in which one organism lives near, on or within another organism, and derives benefit therof without injuring or benefiting the other.

noun Commensal organism, see there.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

A micro-organism that lives continuously on, or in certain parts of, the body, without causing disease. Commensals sometimes exclude more dangerous organisms, but may cause disease if they gain access to parts of the body other than their normal habitat.

commensal

(of an organism) living in close association with another organism of a different species where neither has an obvious effect on the other. Examples are some POLYCHAETE worms that live in the tubes of others, and certain bacteria that live on human skin. See SYMBIOSIS.

commensal

organism with a symbiotic host relationship; the organism derives benefit and the host is unharmed

commensal

1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.
References in periodicals archive ?
A healthy gut contains a balanced mixture of many commensal (beneficial) species.
Densities of juvenile and adult commensals varied considerably during the survey period, but some trends were apparent.
This study provides new insights into the protective role of skin commensals and demonstrates that skin health relies on the interaction of commensals and immune cells.
Compartmentalized control of skin immunity by resident commensals.
The researchers build on previous work demonstrating that selective manipulation of the commensal bacterial population could affect the immune system.
arrokeana outside its host, to search for evidence about whether this relationship is either commensal or parasitic.
For instance, since the research shows that harmful bacteria compete with commensal bacteria for certain nutrients that they need to survive, selectively removing some nutrients and boosting others might help.
They also found an inverse relationship between the prevalence of the Staphylococcaceae family of bacteria, whose members include important pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus, and Corynebacteriaceae and Propionibacteriaceaea families, whose members are more commonly benign commensals.
Because the water flow from the mussel's exhalant siphons can be expelled over quite a distance, in addition to rheotactic response, filtering may also act as a sort of chemical beacon to guide the commensals in their search for the appropriate partner (Gotto 1970).
Similar to pathogenic bacteria, commensals are exposed to the selective pressure of antimicrobial agents, and commensal E.
The unique challenge to discriminate between pathogens and commensals requires the dynamic adaptation of Tregs to the microenvironment, particularly in the intestinal mucosa.
Commensals are immunological peacekeepers and the strong arm of immune defenses that promote the proper digestion of food and the excretion of toxins.