commensal

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Related to commensals: plankton, symbiosis

commensal

 [kŏ-men´sal]
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

/com·men·sal/ (kom-men´sil)
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host.
2. a parasite that causes no harm to the host.

commensal

(kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men′sal·ly adv.

commensal

[kəmen′səl]
Etymology: L, com, together, imensa, table
(two different species) living together in an arrangement that is not harmful to either and that may be beneficial to both. Some bacteria in the digestive tract of humans aid in the processing of food and produce B vitamins needed for normal health while causing no harm (normal flora). Compare parasite, synergist.

commensal

adjective Referring to a relationship in which one organism lives near, on or within another organism, and derives benefit therof without injuring or benefiting the other.

noun Commensal organism, see there.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

A micro-organism that lives continuously on, or in certain parts of, the body, without causing disease. Commensals sometimes exclude more dangerous organisms, but may cause disease if they gain access to parts of the body other than their normal habitat.

commensal

(of an organism) living in close association with another organism of a different species where neither has an obvious effect on the other. Examples are some POLYCHAETE worms that live in the tubes of others, and certain bacteria that live on human skin. See SYMBIOSIS.

commensal

organism with a symbiotic host relationship; the organism derives benefit and the host is unharmed

commensal

1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.
References in periodicals archive ?
epidermidis is a common commensal bacterium of the skin, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen.
Change in commensal bacteria is key to the inflammatory processes and are also altered in the presence of inflammation.
This work is one of the few studies on parasites and commensals of treefrogs from Western Mexico (e.
Commensal bacteria can alter virulence of bacterial pathogens and interfere with antibiotic treatment.
A healthy gut contains a balanced mixture of many commensal (beneficial) species.
Although immune cells in the skin protect against harmful organisms, until now, it has not been known if the millions of naturally occurring commensal bacteria in the skin - collectively known as the skin microbiota - also have a beneficial role.
arrokeana outside its host, to search for evidence about whether this relationship is either commensal or parasitic.
Study Selection: A total of 49 original articles were selected in accordance with our main objective to illustrate the resistance mechanism(s) by which commensal microbiota can contribute to host defense against local and systemic infections.
A 2012 mouse study, led by Shruti Naik, shows that resident skin commensals promote interleukin-1 signaling and T cell function in response to local inflammatory cues.
The organisms include commensals and pathogenic microorganisms.
It may be beneficial to identify the specific commensals and commensal-derived signals that regulate circulating basophil populations as this could lead to the development of new probiotic or other commensal-derived therapies," he said.