commensalism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

commensalism

 [kŏ-men´sal-izm]
symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm),
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed; for example, Entamoeba coli in the human large intestine. Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism.
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

/com·men·sal·ism/ (-izm) symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

commensalism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

commensalism

[kəmen′səliz′əm]
a symbiosis in which one species benefits but the other species is neither helped nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm)
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed.
Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
11) Moreover, everywhere, India and elsewhere, "guest peoples" were usually excluded from intermarriage and commensalism, and therefore are held to be ritually impure.
Commensalism (com-men-sal-ism)is a partnership that helps one of the members but neither member hurts the other.
He further recognized three kinds of such interactions: parasitism, commensalism and mutualism.
Although competitive and rival economic relationships are important, economics would be enriched by taking greater account of mutualistic economic relationships, as well as identifying situations of economic interdependence that are essentially parasitic in nature (usually involving some criminal activity, such as protection rackets), and those entailing commensalism (compare Svizzero and Tisdell, 2001).
The fact that mutualism and commensalism are widespread confirms there is a distinct gain in fitness terms, whether through reduced contramensalism (when close association with one species reduces predation pressure or parasite loads on another), or by an increase in feeding success (when the association of two species with different feeding techniques facilitates feeding for one or both).
They are aquatic organisms that live in hydrated terrestrial soils, freshwater and marine sediments and many species are adapted for various symbiotic associations with other animals, including commensalism, mutualism, and parasitism of larger (meso- to macrofaunal-sized) terrestrial arthropods (Giblin-Davis 2004).
8), (9) Thus, ECM nutritional deficits and toxicity need to be addressed in fibromyalgia with microbiotica-based quorum nutrients and effective clinical ways to restore commensalism and symbiosis.
Hansen (1970) determined the benefit of commensalism for Haliotis rufescens (Swainson 1822) and Haliotis cracherodii (Leach 1817) as a function of the shell age.
Temple monkeys and health implications of commensalism, Kathmandu, Nepal.
The chapter also deals with commensalism and piracy, area defense, feeding dispersion, and age and foraging.
Apparent commensalism among three Vaccinium species on a climatic gradient.
It is defined as a form of commensalism facilitating the physical transport of one organism on the body of another, during which time no feeding or reproduction occurs in the phoretic organism (Binns 1982; O'Connor 1982).