commensal


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commensal

 [kŏ-men´sal]
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

/com·men·sal/ (kom-men´sil)
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host.
2. a parasite that causes no harm to the host.

commensal

(kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men′sal·ly adv.

commensal

[kəmen′səl]
Etymology: L, com, together, imensa, table
(two different species) living together in an arrangement that is not harmful to either and that may be beneficial to both. Some bacteria in the digestive tract of humans aid in the processing of food and produce B vitamins needed for normal health while causing no harm (normal flora). Compare parasite, synergist.

commensal

adjective Referring to a relationship in which one organism lives near, on or within another organism, and derives benefit therof without injuring or benefiting the other.

noun Commensal organism, see there.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

A micro-organism that lives continuously on, or in certain parts of, the body, without causing disease. Commensals sometimes exclude more dangerous organisms, but may cause disease if they gain access to parts of the body other than their normal habitat.

commensal

(of an organism) living in close association with another organism of a different species where neither has an obvious effect on the other. Examples are some POLYCHAETE worms that live in the tubes of others, and certain bacteria that live on human skin. See SYMBIOSIS.

commensal

organism with a symbiotic host relationship; the organism derives benefit and the host is unharmed

commensal

1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.
References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned above, we did not find any published comparative data on mice or other commensal rodents.
typhimurium ) can compete commensal microbes by actively triggering and increasing intestinal inflammation.
In healthy adults, the amount of diversity seen in skin commensal bacteria is staggering," say James A.
Citation: "PGRP-SC2 Promotes Gut Immune Homeostasis to Limit Commensal Dysbiosis and Extend Lifespan"; Linlin Guo et al.
Although this bacterium has been rarely reported as a cause of human infections, it should be considered as an opportunistic pathogen, especially in patients who have aspiration pneumonia, because it is likely a commensal of the upper respiratory tract.
The organisms include commensals and pathogenic microorganisms.
The investigators colonized germ-free mice (mice bred with no naturally occurring microbes in the gut or skin) with the human skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis.
Research has shown that this can select for antibiotic-resistant commensal and pathogenic bacteria on poultry farms and in poultry-derived products.
There's a lot of beneficial effects of having commensal bacteria," says Akiko Iwasaki, a Yale University immunologist who led the study.
Background & objectives: The intestinal epithelium is part of the innate immune system responding to contact with pathogenic or commensal bacteria.
This bacterium has a commensal relationship with humans, where one organism (H.
lactamica is a commensal species that commonly inhabits the human nasopharynx.