comfrey


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comfrey

/com·frey/ (kom´fre) the perennial herb Symphytum officinale, or a preparation of its leaves and roots, which are demulcent and astringent and are used topically for bruises and sprains and to promote bone healing; also used in folk medicine.

comfrey

(kŭm′frē)
n. pl. com·freys
Any of various hairy perennial Eurasian herbs of the genus Symphytum, especially S. officinale, having variously colored flowers in coiled cymes and long used in herbal medicine.

comfrey

a perennial herb found in the United States, Australia, and parts of Asia, also cultivated in Japan.
uses It is used for bruises, sprains, broken bones, acne, and boils. It is considered safe and possibly effective when used topically.
contraindications Medicinal teas of comfrey are considered unsafe. Use of topical comfrey is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, and in those who are hypersensitive to this product. Internal use may cause fatal hepatotoxicity. It should not be used for more than 6 weeks or topically on broken skin.
enlarge picture
Comfrey leaf

comfrey

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb, the leaves and roots of which contain allantoin, carotene, essential oil, glycosides, mucilage, resin, saponins, tannins, triterpenoids, vitamin B12 and zinc. Comfrey is a medicinal herb staple, promoting the growth of bone and connective tissue, and breaks down red blood cells (hence its popular name, bruisewort). It is anti-inflammatory, and has been used internally for haemorrhage, diarrhoea, gastric ulcers, colitis, bronchitis, whooping cough, and other respiratory tract infections; it is used topically for burns, bruises, sprains, boils, sore breasts, ulcers, gangrene, haemorrhoids and varicose veins.
 
Toxic effects
Liver tumours may develop in lab rats when exposed to high levels; it is a potential carcinogen.

comfrey,

n Latin name:
Symphytum officinale; parts used: leaves, roots; uses: wound healing, antiinflammatory for bruises and sprains; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; external use only; do not use for more than 6 weeks a year; can cause hepatotoxicity, nausea, liver adenoma. Also called
black root, blackwort, boneset, bruisewort, consound, gum plant, healing herb, knitback, knitbone, salsifly, slippery root, and
wallwort.

comfrey

References in periodicals archive ?
It would do wonders along with the comfrey for our compost heap.
Using a double blind multicentre randomised clinical trial with parallel group design over a period of five days, 120 people (average age 37 years) were treated three times daily with 4 g of either comfrey ointment or placebo.
FDA Advises Dietary Supplement Manufacturers to Remove Comfrey Products from the Market [letter to industry].
However, while information is generally lacking to establish a cause and effect relationship between comfrey ingestion and observed adverse effects on humans, the adverse effects that have been seen are entirely consistent with the known effects of comfrey ingestion described in scientific literature.
Lawrence does not recommend comfrey for lactating mothers.
Comfrey is a product that is made from the plant Symphytum officinale L.
Two other shade-tolerant herbs in Rosen's garden are comfrey (Symphytum officinale) and bee balm (Monarda didyma).
Combine equal amounts of comfrey, mallow, marigold, marjoram, pansy, yarrow and orange mint.
Meanwhile, in Comfrey and Amarillo the parishes pick up the expenses connected with the rectories, and those expenses are considered part of the pastoral administrator's overall compensation package.
The parties are currently "in discovery" exchanging documents and depositions, and then they are headed for the trial calendar, said Kathleen Comfrey, an attorney with Shearman & Sterling, the plaintiff's pro-bono representation against the newspaper.
The alkaloids in comfrey root--and possibly the leaves--are damaging to the liver," says herb-industry spokesperson McCaleb.