knowledge

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knowledge

 [nŏ´lej]
the ability of a client to remember and interpret information.
knowledge deficit (specify) a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the absence or deficiency of cognitive information related to a specific topic. For purposes of assessing knowledge deficit, setting objectives, and planning and implementing patient teaching, three broad areas or domains are recognized: the cognitive, the affective, and the psychomotor domains. These were devised by Benjamin S. Bloom and colleagues as a part of a taxonomy of educational objectives, whose purpose is to classify and better identify specific goals for teaching, learning, and evaluation of outcomes of the process.

The cognitive domain deals with the recall or recognition of knowledge and the development of intellectual abilities and skills. The affective domain encompasses interest, attitudes, and values. The psychomotor domain is the manipulative or motor-skill area of learning.

Learning objectives in each of these domains should be stated in behavioral terms. Educators contend that a change in behavior is evidence that learning has taken place. Hence, criteria by which one judges whether learning has occurred are written in terms of what the learner is able to do as a result of instruction. In the cognitive domain a goal of learning might be that the patient verbalizes dosage of prescribed medication, its expected actions, and any untoward reactions to be reported. In the affective domain, a change in attitude or value is observed as a change in behavior. Thus the fact that a patient loses the desired amount of weight in a specific period of time while following a special diet is evidence that the diet is valued and therefore has been followed. In the psychomotor domain a goal could be that the patient is able to take and record his or her own blood pressure accurately each day.

The overall purposes of assessing and implementing plans for correction of a knowledge deficit are to assist the patient and family members (1) to promote their own health and that of family members, (2) to maintain current health status and improve it as much as possible according to each person's capabilities, and (3) to improve to the fullest one's self-care abilities.

knowledge

classified in psychology as (1) declarative knowledge awareness of factual information; (2) procedural knowledge knowledge of how to perform a task.
References in periodicals archive ?
and John Glaser, "Just-In-Time Delivery Comes to Knowledge Management," Harvard Business Review, July 2002
Bill Jones, head of TMT, said: 'Tom is the best there is when it comes to knowledge and experience of e-commerce issues and his advice will make a unique and invaluable contribution to our growth plans in this sector.
The segment employs six million workers, yet many of them lack proper training when it comes to knowledge about cosmetic products.
what is the role of the intranet when it comes to knowledge management?
Brown comes to Knowledge Networks from SymphonyIRI Group, where he led strategic work for major CPG companies and associations.
Instead of knowledge workers going to work, work now comes to knowledge workers.
8220;When it comes to knowledge of athletes and the pain and injuries related to intense training, you can't find a better source of information than Dr.
We appreciate that it is important that they are always one step ahead when it comes to knowledge of advances in the industry.
A total of 180 pubs have signed up for the challenge to find the most clued-up group of regulars when it comes to knowledge of local history.
Star Wars'' fans are infamous for their holier-than-thou attitude when it comes to knowledge of movie minutiae, but legions of them could be hoarding valuable ``collectibles'' that might in fact just be ordinary toys.