combination


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Related to combination: Combination reaction

com·bi·na·tion

(kom'bi-nā'shŭn),
1. The act of combining (that is, by joining, uniting, or otherwise bringing into close association) separate entities.
2. The state of being so combined.
References in classic literature ?
sour, acrid, salt, sweet, bitter), yet combinations of them yield more flavors than can ever be tasted.
In the face of labor-saving machinery, of organized production, of the increased efficiency of combination, you would set the economic sun back a whole generation or so to the time when there were no great capitalists, no great machinery, no railroads--a time when a host of little capitalists warred with each other in economic anarchy, and when production was primitive, wasteful, unorganized, and costly.
That, gentlemen, is socialism, a greater combination than the trusts, a greater economic and social combination than any that has as yet appeared on the planet.
Men uniting in these combinations always assume such relations toward one another that the larger number take a more direct share, and the smaller number a less direct share, in the collective action for which they have combined.
Of all the combinations in which men unite for collective action one of the most striking and definite examples is an army.
Dwar: 3 feathers; 3 spaces straight in any direction or combination.
Chief: Diadem with ten jewels; 3 spaces in any direction; straight or diagonal or combination.
He did not accomplish it in a day, or in a week, or in a month, or in a year; but slowly, very slowly, he learned after he had grasped the possibilities which lay in those little bugs, so that by the time he was fifteen he knew the various combinations of letters which stood for every pictured figure in the little primer and in one or two of the picture books.
When he discovered the arrangement of words in alphabetical order he delighted in searching for and finding the combinations with which he was familiar, and the words which followed them, their definitions, led him still further into the mazes of erudition.
There is another young lady here, who is less abnormally developed than the one I have just described, but who yet bears the stamp of this peculiar combination of incompleteness and effeteness.
Then there is nothing impossible or out of the order of nature in our finding a guardian who has a similar combination of qualities?
I have always believed in the principle of watching closely the various signs of the times, and I may say that I came to the conclusion that a combination of the thinking members of the aristocratic party throughout the world was an excellent idea.