combat fatigue


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combat fatigue

n.
Posttraumatic stress disorder resulting from wartime combat or similar experiences. No longer in scientific use. Also called battle fatigue.

combat fatigue

Etymology: L, com, together, battuere, to beat, fatigare, to tire
any of a variety of psychological disorders, usually temporary but sometimes permanent, resulting from exhaustion, the stress of combat, or the cumulative emotions and psychological strain of warfare or other traumatic situations. It is characterized by anxiety, depression, irritability, memory and sleep disorders, and various related symptoms. Also called combat neurosis; war neurosis. See also posttraumatic stress disorder, shell shock.
The approved US Army term (AR 40-216) for combat stress symptoms and reactions which
• Feel unpleasant.
• Interfere with mission performance.
• Are best treated with reassurance, rest, replenishment of physical needs, and activities which restore confidence. The condition affects soldiers after long tours of combat duty and is characterised by a loss of self-esteem, anxiety, tremulousness, depression, extreme emotional lability, dyspepsia, and dyspnea.
Battle fatigue can also be present in soldiers who have been physically wounded or who have non-battle injuries or diseases caused by stressors in the combat area. It may be necessary to treat both the battle fatigue and the other problems.

Battle fatigue may coexist with misconduct stress behaviors. However, battle fatigue itself, by definition, does not warrant legal or disciplinary action

combat fatigue

Battle fatigue, combat shock Psychiatry A condition that affects soldiers after long tours of combat duty, which is characterized by a loss of self-esteem, anxiety, tremulousness, depression, extreme emotional lability, dyspepsia, dyspnea. See 'Burn-out syndrome. ', Old soldier's heart, Post-traumatic stress disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the diagnosis of combat fatigue was commonly used by military psychiatrists, it had no widely accepted analogue in civilian psychiatry.
To combat fatigue and possible carpal tunnel damage, keyboard users have ergonomic keyboards and mice, sponge wrist rests, even wrist splints, but what about those who write as much as they type?
Taken before and during the workout, they will help combat fatigue and fuel the working muscles.
If your job performance is threatened by your symptoms--for example, if you need time for a nap to combat fatigue, or a workspace near the bathroom because of bladder dysfunction, then you need to seek an accommodation.
Detailed reviews address disorders such as PTSD, anxiety, major depression, psychoses and related disorders such as combat fatigue and burnout.
All the diligent efforts of the saner elements to create a peace dividend have gone to waste, thanks to the misuse of combat fatigue.
Also make sure your keep hydrated; water is best to combat fatigue.
The shell shock of World War I and the combat fatigue of World War II proved just as potentially debilitating to soldiers as many of their physical wounds.
Air Force flight crews find themselves having to combat fatigue before, during, and after they go to combat the enemy.
Only 22 per cent of those driving for work said they had received advice from their employers about how to combat fatigue, while only a third (33 per cent) of people driving for work recognised the three measures proven to combat fatigue on the road.
Within one week in the late summer of 1943, at a time when General George Patton was making dramatic breakthroughs against the Germans in Sicily, the hotheaded general twice struck soldiers suffering from combat fatigue.
Adrenal Complex helps restore adrenal function to reduce the effects of stress on the body and combat fatigue.

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