columella


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columella

 [kol″u-mel´ah] (pl. columel´lae) (L.)
a little column.
columella na´si the fleshy external termination of the septum of the nose.

col·u·mel·la

, pl.

col·u·mel·lae

(kol'ū-mel'ă, -mel'ē),
1. A column, or a small column. Synonym(s): columnella
2. In fungi, a sterile invagination of a sporangium, as in Zygomycetes.
[L. dim. of columna, column]

columella

/col·u·mel·la/ (kol″u-mel´ah) pl. columel´lae   [L.]
1. a little column.
2. in certain fungi and protozoa, an invagination into the sporangium.

columella coch´leae  modiolus.
columella na´si  the fleshy external end of the nasal septum.

columella

(kŏl′yə-mĕl′ə, kŏl′ə-)
n. pl. colu·mellae (-mĕl′ē)
Any small columnlike structure in various plants and animals, often forming the central axis of development for the organism or an anatomical structure.

col′u·mel′lar (-mĕl′ər) adj.
col′u·mel′late′ (-mĕl′āt′) adj.

columella

1 a small column.
2 the fleshy terminal portion of the nasal septum.

col·u·mel·la

, pl. columellae (kol'yū-mel'ă, -ē)
1. A small column.
Synonym(s): columnella.
2. In fungi, a sterile invagination of a sporangium, as in Zygomycetes.
[L. dim. of columna, column]

columella

The ridge of skin between the nostrils.
Columellaclick for a larger image
Fig. 117 Columella (2). The sporangium of Mucor.

columella

  1. the sterile central column in the sporangia of mosses and liverworts.
  2. the domed structure forming a pillar supporting the sporangium of some fungi, e.g. Mucor. See Fig. 117 .
  3. the central area of a root cap which contains STATOLITHS (1).
  4. the central axis of a fruit.

Columella

The strip of skin running from the tip of the nose to the upper lip, which separates the nostrils.
Mentioned in: Rhinoplasty

columella

pl. columellae [L.] a little column.

columella auris
a connecting rod between the avian eardrum and the perilymph of the inner ear via the rod's footplate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human life may be transitory and full of trouble, but the perennial mind, whose survey extends from that spring to this, from Columella to Hosmer, is superior to change.
This solitary midden at Northport contained some fifty carefully ground distal ends of the central stock, or columella, of a large univalve which, from its size and from the abundance of other parts of the shells nearby, were obtained from the "knobbed whelk" (Fulgar [=Busycon] carica).
Columella surely makes a part of the "abundant intertextualities" of which Harris speaks.
In this article, we will focus on ten Greek and Roman writers who mentioned the king bee, namely Plato, Xenophon, Aristotle, Varro, Virgil, Seneca the Younger, Columella, Pliny the Elder, Dio Chrysostom and Aelian.
The marking of trees is mentioned by the classical authors Cato, Vera and Columella as a way of identifying woodland or other territories (Nenninger 2001).
En Corrientes la distribucion de F hepatica se ha ampliado en la ultimas decadas debido al crecimiento de zonas bajas inundables por causa de embalses artificiales (4,15) y tambien por la aparicion, en las zonas norte y este de la provincia, de un nuevo huesped intermediario, un pequeno caracol pulmonado denominado Lymnaea columella (16,18), que se suma a los ya conocidos L.
Other literary sources are the casual references to eating and drinking encountered everywhere in Greek and Latin literature and technical treatises: cookery books (first written by the Greeks in the 4th century BC), works on the rustic agricultural world (Cato, Varro and Columella, Hesiod's Works and Days), technical treatises on food and medicine (Aristotle, Theophrastus), works on zoology, botany, cities, agriculture, travel, geography, the encyclopedic works (Pliny the Elder), and Porphyry's treatise On Abstinence (3rd century AD).
The beak and columella were visible at hatch and grew quickly, often presenting an almost translucent shell layer that gradually darkened with age (Fig.
In his description of the Grotta di Posillipo, for example, after quoting Columella and Strabo on the history of the tunnel that connects Naples with the Phlegraean Fields, Alberti appears in the flesh: "la qual [grotta] io curiosamente volendo vedere, la misurai e la ritrovai esser larga oltre di dodici piedi et altro tanto alta" (italics mine).