colors

(redirected from colours)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to colours: Primary colours

col·ors

chromatophobia, chromophobia.
References in classic literature ?
Some day you will look at your friend, and he will seem to you to be a little out of drawing, or you won't like his tone of colour, or something.
Now we are delighted at that,' said both the weavers, and thereupon they named the colours and explained the make of the texture.
Immoral, licentious, anarchical, unscientific -- call them by what names you will -- yet, from an aesthetic point of view, those ancient days of the Colour Revolt were the glorious childhood of Art in Flatland -- a childhood, alas, that never ripened into manhood, nor even reached the blossom of youth.
The magical colours disappeared by degrees, and the shades of emerald and sapphire were effaced.
Red, yellow, and such colours, though qualities, have no contraries.
It was a noble gathering of the fairest and the swiftest, each bearing at the bow the carved emblem of her name, as in a gallery of plaster-casts, figures of women with mural crowns, women with flowing robes, with gold fillets on their hair or blue scarves round their waists, stretching out rounded arms as if to point the way; heads of men helmeted or bare; full lengths of warriors, of kings, of statesmen, of lords and princesses, all white from top to toe; with here and there a dusky turbaned figure, bedizened in many colours, of some Eastern sultan or hero, all inclined forward under the slant of mighty bowsprits as if eager to begin another run of 11,000 miles in their leaning attitudes.
A want of keeping is observable sometimes in the character of the several pieces of furniture, but generally in their colours or modes of adaptation to use Very often the eye is offended by their inartistic arrangement.
Presently my colours broke from one of Zat Arras' ships.
He had an eye for colour which was more highly trained than that of anyone in the department, and he had kept from his student days in Paris some knowledge of line.
As they drew nearer and could distinguish details, the effect of the earth with its minute objects and colours and different forms of life was overwhelming after four weeks of the sea, and kept them silent.
Indeed; he knew better than any one else at Haarlem or Leyden -- the two towns which boast the best soil and the most congenial climate -- how to vary the colours, to modify the shape, and to produce new species.
After listening to him for an hour, while he painted in vivid colours the extreme danger of fire consuming the house, the Hard Man to Deal With said: