colony


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Related to colony: Bacterial colony

colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

/col·o·ny/ (kol´ah-ne) a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

colony

[kol′ənē]
Etymology: L, colonia
1 (in bacteriology) a mass of microorganisms in a culture that originates from a single cell. Some kinds of colonies, according to different configurations, are smooth colonies, rough colonies, and dwarf colonies.
2 (in cell biology) a mass of cells in a culture or in certain experimental tissues, such as a spleen colony.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.

colony

a discrete group of organisms, as a single cluster of bacteria in a culture that was produced from a single starting bacterium.

colony-forming units
colonies of pluripotent stem cells located and quantified in the spleen. Colonies grown in vitro interact with erythropoietin to give rise to morphologically identifiable erythroid cells.
colony-stimulating factors
cytokines produced by lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes which stimulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Includes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
This colony contained 1 male (primary reproductive), no eggs, no larvae, 43 workers, 5 soldiers, and 5 nymphs (Fig.
The Colony Group Continues to Execute on Aggressive Growth Strategy
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- A new long-term study of honey bee health has found that a little-understood disease study authors are calling "idiopathic brood disease syndrome" (IBDS), which kills off bee larvae, is the largest risk factor for predicting the death of a bee colony.
The Palestinian National Authority (PNA) has come under significant pressure from Israel to suspend its national campaign to boycott colony products.
RAWALPINDI, August 13, 2010 (Frontier Star): The slum dwellers of Christian colony Nazirabad have demanded of department of Anti Narcotics to take strict action against drug smuggling in the colony.
RAWALPINDI, August 13, 2010 (Balochistan Times): The slum dwellers of Christian colony Nazirabad have demanded of department of Anti Narcotics to take strict action against drug smuggling in the colony.
In those cases, when an army ant colony loses its queen, its workers are absorbed, not killed, by neighboring colonies, and within days are treated as part of the family.
The spokesman of the Main Punishment Execution Department of the Justice Ministry said 2 days ago convicts in several penal colonies supported illegal demands of the convicts in the penal colony No.
1585-1582: In 1585, English explorer Sir Walter Raleigh sends 108 men to start a colony on Roanoke Island, off the coast of today's North Carolina.
The natural world abounds with other spectacular examples of animals moving in concert: a school of fish making a hairpin turn, an ant colony building giant highways, or locusts marching across the plains.
They served their neighbors and the crown in a remarkable manner, sacrificing time and monetary gain to do the king's bidding in his fairest colony.
Putting aside political or religious principles, colonies such as Virginia, the Bay Colony, and Barbados opted for neutrality to protect their charters and the free trade that made profit possible.