colony

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colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

/col·o·ny/ (kol´ah-ne) a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

colony

[kol′ənē]
Etymology: L, colonia
1 (in bacteriology) a mass of microorganisms in a culture that originates from a single cell. Some kinds of colonies, according to different configurations, are smooth colonies, rough colonies, and dwarf colonies.
2 (in cell biology) a mass of cells in a culture or in certain experimental tissues, such as a spleen colony.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.

colony

a discrete group of organisms, as a single cluster of bacteria in a culture that was produced from a single starting bacterium.

colony-forming units
colonies of pluripotent stem cells located and quantified in the spleen. Colonies grown in vitro interact with erythropoietin to give rise to morphologically identifiable erythroid cells.
colony-stimulating factors
cytokines produced by lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes which stimulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Includes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Palestinian Authority official Ghassan Daghlas said a group of colonists confronted Odeh and ordered him to move.
BuCor said the grant of colonist status to Go did not carry with it the automatic commutation of his sentence from the indivisible penalty of reclusion perpetua to 30 years because only the President has the power to commute a sentence.
Again, from his optics of a colonist, Garfunkel corroborates this fact.
The festival honors the Colonists, especially this year, which marks the 75th anniversary of the settlers' arrival, said Jillyan Webb, executive director of the Palmer Chamber of Commerce.
On the other hand, the same officials wished to maintain control over the colonists on the frontier.
Implicit within Hakluyt's vision was the view that the Native Americans and the colonists would live together in peace and community once the American Indians had accepted Christianity.
As the colonists looked toward the last quarter of the eighteenth century, they might have given serious thought to at least three powerful reasons not to fight: they were safe, prosperous, and free.
The skeleton might also have belonged to any of four other prominent male colonists who died in their mid-30s between 1607 and 1610, Kelso says.
Foucault observes that there was a long French tradition for claiming success in transforming outlaws into "normal" citizens: "la surveillance et avec elle la normalisation devient un des grands instruments de pouvoir" (Foucault 1975 186) Furthermore, Genet's biographer, Edmund White, presents the discipline imposed on the colonist at Mettray as involved in the game of being and not being seen: "the principle was stressed of making all the inmates invisible to one another but visible to one centrally placed supervisor" (White 1993 65) Despite the tradition and the game, the colonists in Genet's Mettray construct their own network "dans la maison de correction de Mettray ou l'homosexualite etait reprouvee, evidemment" (Genet 1990 45).
In the absence of more specific information, we assigned the breeding system of the colonist based on genera or species related to the endemic Hawaiian taxa; in most cases, however, the closest sister taxon of the Hawaiian species is unknown.
Empire by Collaboration: Indians, Colonists, and Governments in Colonial Illinois Country.
Colonists must make decisions about the future of the colony based on facts, opinions, and alternative solutions.