colony

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colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

/col·o·ny/ (kol´ah-ne) a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

colony

[kol′ənē]
Etymology: L, colonia
1 (in bacteriology) a mass of microorganisms in a culture that originates from a single cell. Some kinds of colonies, according to different configurations, are smooth colonies, rough colonies, and dwarf colonies.
2 (in cell biology) a mass of cells in a culture or in certain experimental tissues, such as a spleen colony.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.

colony

a discrete group of organisms, as a single cluster of bacteria in a culture that was produced from a single starting bacterium.

colony-forming units
colonies of pluripotent stem cells located and quantified in the spleen. Colonies grown in vitro interact with erythropoietin to give rise to morphologically identifiable erythroid cells.
colony-stimulating factors
cytokines produced by lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes which stimulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Includes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a mere bribe for the colonists to secure their permanent support for the Israeli government," he told Gulf News.
An investigation by the Israeli newspaper Haaretz entitled How does the US help fund pro-settler colonist IDF troops?
The festival honors the Colonists, especially this year, which marks the 75th anniversary of the settlers' arrival, said Jillyan Webb, executive director of the Palmer Chamber of Commerce.
The author examines the processes of primitive accumulation by which white colonists gradually extracted surplus product and labor from the Khoisan population (pp.
6 Best riding performance Stan Mellor (1966) This triple champion robbed Arkle with a masterpiece of opportunism on 25-1 shot Stalbridge Colonist, conjuring a decisive leap out of the grey at the final fence
Dean McMenamie's piece was in reaction to stories published in the Times Colonist, which quoted some parishioners as saying they were "shocked" at the recommendations and they would oppose plans to close their churches.
The occupation forces handed the two houses belonging to the Abu Nab family to Ateret Cohanim, a Jewish colonist group working to establish a Jewish majority in occupied east Jerusalem.
The skeleton might also have belonged to any of four other prominent male colonists who died in their mid-30s between 1607 and 1610, Kelso says.
Ron Blindell, 47, a railway company manager from Hungerford whose father, of the same name, owned the Ken Cundell-trained grey Stalbridge Colonist at the time of his Newbury triumph.
Dentistry has come a long way in the brief history of America, when the first colonists were established, says the Academy of General Dentistry, an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing education.
One notable disaster occurred in 1859 when British colonist Thomas Austin imported 24 rabbits for sport hunting.