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colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

/col·o·ny/ (kol´ah-ne) a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

colony

[kol′ənē]
Etymology: L, colonia
1 (in bacteriology) a mass of microorganisms in a culture that originates from a single cell. Some kinds of colonies, according to different configurations, are smooth colonies, rough colonies, and dwarf colonies.
2 (in cell biology) a mass of cells in a culture or in certain experimental tissues, such as a spleen colony.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.

colony

a discrete group of organisms, as a single cluster of bacteria in a culture that was produced from a single starting bacterium.

colony-forming units
colonies of pluripotent stem cells located and quantified in the spleen. Colonies grown in vitro interact with erythropoietin to give rise to morphologically identifiable erythroid cells.
colony-stimulating factors
cytokines produced by lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes which stimulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Includes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a different experiment initiated in 2013, twelve 1-yr-old colonies of C.
The study evaluated the health of 80 commercial colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera) in the eastern United States on an almost monthly basis over the course of 10 months -- which is a full working "season" for commercial bee colonies.
Colonies of army ants, whose long columns and marauding habits are the stuff of natural-history legend, are usually antagonistic to each other, attacking soldiers from rival colonies in border disputes that keep the colonies separate.
Convict in several penal colonies in Kyrgyzstan decided to go on hunger strike and refused to line up for checks of convicts since August 10.
They have constructed mathematical models of animal swarms and colonies that take inspiration from decades of physics research.
By the time Edmund entered manhood, however, tumult between England and her American colonies was complicating this relationship, and the scent of sedition wafted through the halls of Parliament as clouds of contention darkened the eastern and western shores of the Atlantic.
1) But as Pestana argues in her latest book, The English Atlantic in an Age of Revolution, the empire was created in the seventeenth century, when the English Revolution set in motion political, economic, and social changes that redefined the relationship between England and its colonies across the Atlantic world.
Global connections: Why France needed immigrant workers, where its colonies were, and how those connections relate to current problems.
Note that Africans who were hired by Europeans to oversee their colonies often ruled cruelly.
The generation time for SCVs is up to 9-fold longer than for metabolically normal strains, which results in tiny colonies that are frequently not visible until after 48 to 72 hours of incubation.
Anecdotally, some beekeepers nationwide have lost up to 75 percent of their colonies due to the mites.
European Colonies in the Americas" (0823972836, $74.