colony

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Related to colonialism: Postcolonialism, Neo colonialism

colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

/col·o·ny/ (kol´ah-ne) a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

colony

[kol′ənē]
Etymology: L, colonia
1 (in bacteriology) a mass of microorganisms in a culture that originates from a single cell. Some kinds of colonies, according to different configurations, are smooth colonies, rough colonies, and dwarf colonies.
2 (in cell biology) a mass of cells in a culture or in certain experimental tissues, such as a spleen colony.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.

colony

a discrete group of organisms, as a single cluster of bacteria in a culture that was produced from a single starting bacterium.

colony-forming units
colonies of pluripotent stem cells located and quantified in the spleen. Colonies grown in vitro interact with erythropoietin to give rise to morphologically identifiable erythroid cells.
colony-stimulating factors
cytokines produced by lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes which stimulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Includes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
In regards to the coloniser's justification of colonialism as a civilising process, Cesaire shows that Africa had much advanced and thriving civilisation before colonialism.
The writers state that colonialism "impedes the social, cultural and economic development of dependent peoples.
The 1857 rebellion was a crucial challenge to British colonialism which ended the company rule.
Mohammed Saleh Al-Radfani, an Aden resident, relayed his views on the positive economic metamorphosis colonialism brought.
Abadou said this had become a "national duty" and a "response to the law glorifying colonialism which was adopted by the French parliament in 2005," the APS news agency said.
The main interrogation of this analysis is whether and if an approximation is possible at the conceptual level between the areas of colonialism and communism (focusing on the beginning of the Cold War period but discussing, in connection, the more recent theories on post-communism and post-colonialism) and if this approximation can be achieved, how could we approach in this context (and what motivates this approach) the case of the Romanian culture as subject to the sovietising process of culture (within the late 1940s ideological shift), read as a form of 'cultural colonialism'.
Colonialism: According to the Executive Summary of the HSRC, "The prohibitions on colonialism and apartheid are rooted principally in the field of international human rights law" and in regard to Palestine and Colonialism, "Israel's annexation of East Jerusalem is manifestly an act based on colonial intent.
Significantly, Jennings contends that the connection between empire and hydrotherapy has "profound repercussions" that extend beyond the history of medicine and colonialism (p.
Casement's experiences in Peru and the Congo had a profound influence on the development of his Irish nationalism because he came to associate the British government with the abuses of colonialism.
Internal Colonialism as a theory has lost much of the currency that it held in the late 1960s.
France should return it to Egypt because it has nothing to do with Paris and is thus an obsolete symbol of colonialism that should be placed back in front of the Luxor Temple," he said.
Rizal was among the heroes who fought against colonialism under Spain for more than 300 years," said Philippine Ambassador Antonio P.