colloquialism

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colloquialism

Vox populi A term of ordinary everyday speech, conversational. See Medical slang.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is why the proposal to introduce the colloquial language was perceived as being misplaced.
Today, one usually thinks in terms of English and French terms invading the colloquial Arabic spoken by Lebanese, but colloquial itself has borrowings from other languages.
It seems to me that Zayn al-`Abidin Fu'ad's line, "In prison, dreams intrude the body of day," is prescient in its encapsulation of Egyptian colloquial Arabic poetry's modern history: its intimate and difficult relationships to political commitment and utopian visions, and to the mundane and the bodily and the tangible and the immediate, or what some of its opponents, then and now, might consider the antipoetic.
Also to be noted is that Arabic is not as inhospitable to initial gemination as is here assumed, at least in its colloquial realizations.
based rock critic Mikal Gilmore, who would go on to write the best seller ``Shot Through the Heart,'' fell hard for their sound: He described Butch Hancock's songs as ``dreamy waltzes and mellifluent narratives, influenced equally by the colloquial wit of Woody Guthrie, the voluble symbolism of Bob Dylan and the Transcendentalist philosophy of Ralph Waldo Emerson'' and described a Joe Ely live performance as ``handling his moves and vocals with a power, timing and passion that would rival James Brown at his best.
MANY BUILDINGS, overtime, are given colloquial labels that distill their symbolic freight, mediating between an architect's intentions and the mystification of a public confronting new forms.
colloquial language, not simply employing it, but exploring the linguistic structures, and then expanding on that so that she eventually creates in works like Muse & Drudge a type of poem that not only presents the colloquial surface, but also demonstrates the process by which the colloquial language generates these phrases, which, in fact, represent points of view, ways of seeing .
The mixture of literary and colloquial expressions in the predominantly colloquial language would be impossible to render in German and even less so in English, and fortunately, the translators recognized the limits imposed on them by their respective languages.
Seneca in Durham," an account of the traditions and social history leading to the work of Jane Lumley, the first woman to translate a Greek tragedy, Euripides's Iphigeneia in Aulis, into colloquial English, gives an exceptional model of research where bits and pieces verify a woman's labor and fit the work into an adequate whole.
But it is the fact that all of these authors wrote in colloquial Arabic that gives rise to the major theoretical subtext of this chapter, which is then carried over into the conclusion: the debate between the proponents of the literary language and the colloquial over which form of Arabic should be used in the drama.
EMscribe Dx's patent pending natural language technology, matches not only routine medical terminology to appropriate codes, but colloquial terms or slang that physicians use as well.
This text is intended for use in an introductory course to colloquial spoken Arabic as heard in the Levant (the Arabic countries of the eastern Mediterranean and Jordan).