colloquialism

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colloquialism

Vox populi A term of ordinary everyday speech, conversational. See Medical slang.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, in her work on the history of Australian English, Joy Damousi has argued that etiquette guides and advice literature for middle-class women from the mid-nineteenth century until the 1940s exhorted them to avoid the use of colloquial language at all costs, as did speech training in schools, as it was perceived as too uneducated and vulgar (2010, 111 & 137).
Those calling for this move - which has spread to television shows, advertising material and even the columns of some newspapers - are saying that their goal is not to undermine Arabic, at a time when those opposing the idea believe that the introduction of the colloquial language to the primary school curricula aims to challenge the Arabic language as the language of religion.
But as I shall demonstrate below, there is also evidence of direct face-to-face contact, most probably through Arab traders who used colloquial Arabic.
Abdulaziz Al-Maqaleh, famous poet and head of Yemen Studies and Research Center, said that poetry that doesn't follow grammar rules is called colloquial poetry.
The colloquial Hindi that he is talking about has replaced many words and vocabularies from Hindi by other languages, spoken among the common people of the countries adjoining India for their convenience.
In the domain of morphology, the morpheme bi- is one of the most important indicators of Colloquial Arabic, but it appears to have only little stylistic value.
On the other hand, while the work as a whole is very enjoyable, parts of it are dragged down by details of character development and the novel shows some evidence of sloppy editing, for example, the extremely colloquial phrase, 'isn't in it' or 'wasn't in it' appears far too often.
She is no prude, but her knowledge of colloquial sex chat is, well, limited.
also reads in a pleasantly colloquial vernacular, avoiding the bogs of technical language.
To the translators" credit, they respect and inventively recreate the colloquial, oral dimension of song, shout, and prayer: readers are always recognizably in the realm of the human voice, artfully "made strange," or stranger--in translation.
Providing an in-depth and "user-friendly" reference through such sayings as "lose face", "foam at the mouth", and "spine-tingling", Body Idioms And More deftly compiles the fascinating aspects of the English language and a linguistic wealth of its colloquial and vernacular facets.