colloidal silver protein

colloidal silver protein

Any of a family of non-FDA-approved compounds that have been promoted as essential mineral supplements for adults, pregnant and lactating women, and children, and have been available in various forms (per os, injectable, vaginal douche). They are claimed to be antiviral (e.g., herpes, HIV), antifungal (e.g., Candida), antibacterial (e.g., tuberculosis) and antiparasitic (e.g., malaria), immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, and effective in treating diabetes mellitus, chronic fatigue syndrome, allergies, cancer, as well as more than 600 other conditions.

There is no known peer-reviewed therapeutic role of colloidal silver protein.
 
Toxicity
Silver is not an essential mineral, has no known physiologic role, and when consumed in excess results in the irreversible condition argyria, which is characterised by a slate-grey skin colour, neurologic defects, diffuse deposition of silver in visceral organs and renal damage
References in periodicals archive ?
Severe generalized argyria secondary to ingestion of colloidal silver protein.
Metal colloids are reactive and can act as reducing agents, bind to proteins, and denature enzymes, and they are efficacious as bactericides in topical formulations (2); however, the oral administration of metallic colloids, in particular colloidal silver protein, has been reported to have toxic effects (2).