collision

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Computers A garbled communication between 2 devices in a local area network (LAN) that results when both attempt to transmit data simultaneously; after colliding, each device waits for a period of time and retries; increased devices on a LAN increase the likelihood of collision
Obstetrics A mechanical obstruction to the birth of twins, such that the lay of one foetus impedes the engagement of the other; the most extreme collision is known as interlocking
Public health Road traffic accident/motor vehicle accident
Radiation physics The interaction between 2 particles—e.g., photons, atomic nuclei, electrons—during which energy, momentum, and charge may be altered

collision

Obstetrics A mechanical obstruction to the birth of twins, such that the lay of one fetus impedes the engagement of the other; the most extreme collision is known as interlocking, see there Public health Motor vehicle accident. See MVA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coun John Alden, cabinet member for leisure, sport and culture, commented: 'With new partnesrhips forged with regional local authorities we hope that the ripple effect of Collide WM 05 will impact on the mainstream arts sector by raising the profile of the Collide commissioned artists.
This finding rules out the idea that dark matter particles can collide and interact with one another, Natarajan contends.
This is what happens to the electrons and positrons that collide in the B Factory.
3 -- color) Above: Midcentury modern flying saucer lamps can be purchased at Futures Collide in Pomona.
A more likely possibility, he notes, is that energetic protons, too massive to be slowed by radiation, collide with either each other or photons.
According to one theory, some massive, dark-matter particles occasionally collide with each other and either generate gamma rays or produce particles that decay into gamma rays.
The trick is to collide a bullet of electrons with a bullet of light," Schoenlein says.
In nuclear interactions, however, protons collide repeatedly as the participating nuclei begin to merge, generating larger than normal numbers of J/y particles.
If the components of these "contact binary asteroids" pull apart but remain gravitationally bound, traveling together as they collide with a planet, they might produce the double craters detected on Earth, the moon, and, most recently, Venus.
One seriously injured as minibus collides with truck in Ankara