collective unconscious


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Related to collective unconscious: Carl Jung

unconscious

 [un-kon´shus]
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind that is not readily accessible to conscious awareness by ordinary means but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs; it is one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.
collective unconscious in jungian psychology, the portion of the unconscious that is theoretically common to mankind.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

in jungian psychology, the combined memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past, the deeper layer of the unconscious, wherein reside archetypes. See: archetype (2).
See also: personal unconscious.

collective unconscious

n.
In Jungian psychology, a part of the unconscious mind, shared by a society, a people, or all humankind, that is the product of ancestral experience.

collective unconscious

Etymology: L, colligere, to gather; AS, un, not; L, conscious, aware
(in analytic psychology) that portion of the unconscious common to all humans. Also called racial unconscious. See also analytic psychology.

collective unconscious

Psychiatry
A concept posited by Carl Gustav Jung regarding an inborn, symbol-rich psychological foundation common to humanity, which differs slightly according to the culture; he postulated that the collective unconsciousness reflected a group mindset, which would allow for telepathy.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

(kŏ-lek'tiv ŭn-kon'shŭs)
psychology The combined engrams or memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past in C.G. Jung's theory.

collective unconscious

An entity, deemed to be a kind of storehouse of ancestral memory, proposed by the Swiss psychiatrist and philosopher Karl Gustav Jung (1875–1961) to explain similarities in symbolism among disparate peoples.
References in periodicals archive ?
One can go a long way with Jung in his argument for the existence of this collective unconscious, but in some of his writings he seems to be suggesting clearly that communication of information is somehow possible between individuals via this vast reservoir.
Bourdieu's notion of habitus (tendency), Jungian concepts of archetype (primordial image), collective unconscious and Hofstede's definition of mental programming can be closely related to Chinese fortune telling social praxis.
It is also evident that while Jung's idea of a universal collective unconscious has not been readily admitted into academia, Frye's Jungian ideas as applied to literary texts became a revered and lasting influence.
Empirical findings about the phenomenology of mind gained from Associative Experiment, has opened a new dimension of artificial intelligence research, allowing us to create a link between a collective unconscious level and a conscious Mind.
Do nations have psychological processes -- even Freudian processes, such as collective egos that can be injured, and repressed guilt feelings that can well up from the collective unconscious -- just as individuals do?
Much of this material was first published in the seventies; but even in writing that appears to be more recent, the critical categories are largely concepts of the sixties, when one could speak of the collective unconscious and rational consciousness with the assurance that these categories would automatically be taken as established dichotomies for critical thought.
Miro, when he planted his paint and palette, harvested a purple-green abstract landscape with iridescent forms drawn from his collective unconscious memory and projected future memories.
Her fables challenge Bettelheim's assertion by providing a penetrating snapshot of the pressures driving our collective unconscious, but without any possibility of resolution.
Walker's latest show suggests that while our collective unconscious is always triggered by reality in one way or another, the sensory discontinuities that constitute the world around us remain unresolved, as much guided and defined by technology's innovations as our mythologies are shaped by popular culture.
No matter how industrialized and hermetic Pernice's sculptures may seem, they bear the traces of an attempt to explore both a personal and collective unconscious process.
Like the sublimely nonsensical images in the best of Robert Wilson's theater productions, these spare, perfectly symmetrical juxtapositions of emotive signage and suggestively empty space create an atmosphere at once personal and so reduced and essence-free as to seem abstracted from the collective unconscious.
That is, before they are objects, they are archetypal forms, the primary forms of the collective unconscious.