collective memory


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collective memory

n.
1. The ability of a community to remember events.
2. The collection of memories shared by a common culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, Connerton's (1989) notion of incorporated memory speaks in favor of how collective memory may feed into one's social identity.
On the subject of collective memory, then, what do cognitive psychologists have to say to historians?
He distinguishes collective memory from autobiographical or historical memory by observing that the collective is socially constructed and socially triggered: "It is, of course, individuals who remember, not groups or institutions, but .
If the loss of memory results in damage of tragic consequences to the individual, albeit unconscious damage, which is often impossible to recover in terms of personal and cultural identity, the possible loss of collective memory in societies amounts to a level of damage that we could not even imagine.
Her questions include the basics of collective memory, but also how we collectively resolve controversies, how those resolutions occur, and how collective memory influences the recall of more recent events (pp.
Her interdisciplinary exploration of the complexities of individual and collective memory shows why Schlussstrichdebatten remain premature in Germany's politics of memory.
This paper aims at explaining why the combined methods of life history and collective memory are considered useful in analyzing teachers' professionalism.
This turning point is occurring at a critical moment, and probably reflects the convergence of individual memories of Africans around the globe towards a uniform space of collective memory in the face of culture and history, politics and economics.
Revision in the collective memory of Eastern Europe began in the mid-1980s--before the fall of the Berlin Wall and breakdown of the Soviet system in Poland and the USSR.
Specifically, how does a text such as Antjie Krog's Country of My Skull, which seeks to straddle the divide of personal, individualised memory and collective memory, contribute to this process in post-apartheid South Africa?
This secondary process not only determines an item's importance to the collective memory of society, but also creates a unitary fiction about what is valued and worth attending to through the costly processes of long-term preservation.
Brundage's research usefully exposes the constant harnessing of collective memory in the South to contemporary political ends.
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