collective memory

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collective memory

n.
1. The ability of a community to remember events.
2. The collection of memories shared by a common culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the collective memories do not get permanent in physical objects such as monuments, memorials, archives, museums and cemeteries, they will not be maintainable and will not be transferable from one generation to the next.
Therefore we may understand memory-governed regime transition as either thick or thin, based on the complexity or scarcity of meaning assigned to change as disputed between narratives emerging from collective memories.
The church's collective memories must be open to a similar revision, while preserving an appropriate stability, if they are to continue serving the spiritual needs of Catholics and other Christians.
It seems that in the situation of the multitude of European collective memories and profound differences in the interpretation of historical events (the best example being the Second World War, the role of Nazism and Stalinism or Holocaust), effective strategy to seek consensus in the scientific, public and political discourses on memory is to investigate collective memories at their local, regional and interregional levels in order to seek commonalities and discussing the differences.
The challenge for theater artists is to translate texts built from collective memories into terms that audiences understand and to which they respond.
The career stories as remembered by the beginners are collective memories of culture and context as well as individual experience.
What makes the task even more difficult is the fact that the concepts of trauma or repression are not very useful in this particular case when all kinds of forces that contribute to the making and unmaking of collective memories are to be explained.
Renan contends that as important as shared collective memories are in the service of nation-building, it is equally important that the nation collectively suppresses specific aspects of knowledge of the past.
Elam's criticism of Wilson's contradictions, omissions, and complicity is highly persuasive, yet in the end, his criticism seems overshadowed by his acknowledgment and praise of Wilson's accomplishment of resurrecting collective memories and individual histories, of reconstructing cultural practices, and of providing silenced voices with speech.
Some historical background is necessary to understand the current struggle with Iran--especially because collective memories on both sides drive so much of the tension today.
Racing's collective memories are part of the heart of racing and, as the poll showed, those memories exercise a passionate hold.
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