collateral

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collateral

 [kŏ-lat´er-al]
1. secondary or accessory; not direct or immediate.
2. a small side branch, as of a blood vessel or nerve.

col·lat·er·al

(ko-lat'er-ăl),
1. Indirect, subsidiary, or accessory to the main thing; side by side.
2. A side branch or network of branches of a nerve axon or blood vessel.

collateral

/col·lat·er·al/ (kah-lat´er-al)
1. secondary or accessory; not direct or immediate.
2. a small side branch, as of a blood vessel or nerve.

collateral

[kōlat′ərəl]
Etymology: L, cum, together with, lateralis, side
1 secondary or accessory.
2 (in anatomy) a small branch, such as any one of the arterioles or venules in the body, as in collateral circulation.

collateral

adjective Referring to that which occurs in addition to a desired effect; is located adjacent to or on the radius of a circle; secondary; accessory.
 
Anatomy
noun A small blood vessel or nerve that supplies or innervates a particular region.
 
Chinese medicine
noun An energy channel subsidiary to a meridian, which contains acupressure points or acupoints.

collateral

adjective Referring to that which occurs in addition to a desired effect, is located adjacent to, or on the radius of a circle, secondary, or accessory. See Collateral damage.

col·lat·er·al

(kŏ-lat'ĕr-ăl)
1. Indirect, subsidiary, or accessory to the main thing; side by side.
2. A side branch of a nerve axon or blood vessel.

collateral

a minor side branch of a blood vessel or nerve.

collateral

side branch, e.g. of a nerve or artery

collateral

1. secondary or accessory; not direct or immediate.
2. a side branch, as of a blood vessel or nerve.
3. security for a loan.

collateral circulation
see collateral vessel.
collateral fissure
a longitudinal fissure of the cerebral hemisphere between the fusiform and parahippocampal gyri. Called also collateral sulcus.
collateral ligaments
collateral recruitment
the utilization of many small arterial-capillary units in pulmonary tissue during exercise and increased cardiac output, for increased exchange of gases.
collateral relationship
where two individuals have a common ancestor.
collateral sulcus
see collateral fissure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The heart muscle is fed by coronary arteries; when a large one is blocked, the backup system--nearby collateral arteries--sometimes fills in.
The collateral aren't used by healthy hearts, so to get a picture of them Cohen and Rentrop took advantage of coronary angioplasty (SN: 11/29/80, p.