collateral vessel


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vessel

 [ves´el]
any channel for carrying a fluid, such as blood or lymph; called also vas.
absorbent vessel lymphatic vessel.
blood vessel any of the vessels conveying the blood; an artery, arteriole, vein, venule, or capillary.
collateral vessel
1. a vessel that parallels another vessel, a nerve, or other structure.
2. a vessel important in establishing and maintaining collateral circulation.
great v's the large vessels entering the heart, including the aorta, the pulmonary arteries and veins, and the venae cavae.
lacteal vessel those that take up chyle from the intestinal wall during digestion.
lymphatic v's the capillaries, collecting vessels, and trunks that collect lymph from the tissues and carry it to the blood stream.
nutrient v's vessels supplying nutritive elements to special tissues, as arteries entering the substance of bone or the walls of large blood vessels.

col·lat·er·al ves·sel

[TA]
1. a branch of an artery running parallel with the parent trunk;
2. a vessel that runs in parallel with another vessel, nerve, or other long structure.
Synonym(s): vas collaterale [TA]

collateral vessel

Etymology: L, cum + latus, side, vascellum, small vase
a branch of an artery or vein used as an accessory to the blood vessel from which it arises.

col·lat·er·al ves·sel

(kŏ-lat'ĕr-ăl ves'ĕl) [TA]
1. A branch of an artery running parallel with the parent trunk.
2. A vessel that runs in parallel with another vessel, nerve, or other long structure.

vessel

any channel for carrying a fluid, such as blood or lymph. See also vas.

absorbent v's
lymphatic vessels.
blood vessel
any of the vessels conveying the blood; an artery, arteriole, vein, venule or capillary.
collateral vessel
1. a vessel that parallels another vessel, a nerve, or other structure.
2. a vessel important in establishing and maintaining a collateral circulation.
great v's
the large vessels entering the heart, including the aorta, the pulmonary arteries and veins, and the venae cavae.
lacteal v's
those that take up chyle from the intestinal wall during digestion.
lymphatic v's
the capillaries, collecting vessels, and trunks that collect lymph from the tissues and carry it to lymph nodes or the bloodstream.
nutrient v's
vessels supplying nutritive elements to special tissues, e.g. arteries entering the substance of bone or the walls of large blood vessels.
References in periodicals archive ?
658 Data are presented as mean [+ or -] standard deviation, median (min-max) and percentages * Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square tests ** The relation of circulating inflammatory cell and EPC with collateral vessel growth was searched in the patients who had [greater than or equal to] 90% stenosis in at least one major coronary artery ACEI--angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, ARB--angiotensin II receptor blocker, ASA--acetyl salicylic acid, BP--blood pressure, CABG--coronary bypass surgery, CAD--coronary artery disease, CD34-- cluster domain 34, EF--ejection fraction, FACS--fluorescence- activated cell sorting, HDL--high-density lipoprotein, KDR--kinase insert domain receptor, LDL--low-density lipoprotein, Ml-myocardial infarction, NCA--normal coronary artery Table 3.
ADMA may be responsible for the difference in coronary collateral vessel development among similar patients with coronary artery disease.
However, unlike Doppler sonography, flow characteristic cannot be made in collateral vessels.
Coronary collateral vessels (CC), the remnants of the embryonic arterial system, can develop in the heart as an adaptation to ischemia (1).
The characteristic 'puff/spiral of smoke' appearance of the collateral vessels at the level of the Circle of Willis was noted on conventional angiography.
Determinants of preformed collateral vessels in the human heart without coronary artery disease.
Collateral vessels develop between the right and left coronary arteries.
The use of smaller particles increases the risk of nontarget embolization by particle migration via small collateral vessels.
British Pioneer, one of four collateral vessels related to the Notes (the "British Pioneer"), (b) to provide for the British Pioneer's release as collateral under the related collateral agreements, and (c) to amend and clarify certain other Indenture provisions, collateral agreement provisions, and management agreement provisions ((a), (b) and (c), collectively, the "Proposal").
By establishing a shunt between the carotid artery and femoral vein, blood from the collateral vessels is redirected to the lower pressure venous return.