peccary

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Related to collared peccaries: javelina, Tayassu tajacu, Tayassuidae, Tayassu pecari, Pecari tajacu, Chacoan Peccary

peccary

a South American suiform animal, of the genus Tayassu. Gregarious, omnivorous, small in size, black in color, with a sacculated stomach like a ruminant. Resembles a miniature wild boar. Species include Catagonus wagneri (chacoan peccary), Tayassu tajacu (collared peccary), Tayassu peccari (white-lipped peccary).

peccary flea
pulexporcinus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further efforts are necessary to isolate lepstospires from the urine or renal tissue of collared peccaries to confirm the presence of spirochetes and their potential dissemination into the environment.
Our findings indicate that persons who have contact with collared peccaries and their products, particularly animal caretakers, researchers, hunters, and game traders, are at risk for zoonotic disease (3).
Serologic survey for evidence of exposure to vesicular stomatitis virus, pseudorabies virus, brucellosis and leptospirosis in collared peccaries from Arizona.
Indeed, it is precisely their adaptability that has allowed collared peccaries to expand their range into the U.
Adapting to desert heat, collared peccaries in the American Southwest and northern Mexico undergo an annual molt.
But, during dry months or extended droughts, when most other plants die or become dormant, collared peccaries feed primarily on prickly pear pads.
This is the first report of collared peccaries moving eastward.
There have been introductions of collared peccaries into northern Texas (Schmidly, 2004).
Rate of intake of pods of mesquites by wild boars was > 3 times greater than collared peccaries and raccoons, resulting from high rate of bite and large size of bite by wild boars.
Rates of intake for acorns of live oaks by wild turkeys, wild boars, and white-tailed deer were > 4 times higher than collared peccaries and > 15 times higher than raccoons, resulting from high rates of bites and larger sizes of bites by collared peccaries.
Collared peccaries were obtained as young orphans (< 4 months of age) and were raised by researchers for this study.
After the period of acclimation to diet, collared peccaries were transported to the barn, weighed, and placed singularly in metabolism crates (the crates previously used by wild boars) for their feeding trials.