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collapse

 [kŏ-laps´]
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.
circulatory collapse shock (def. 2).

col·lapse

(kō-laps'),
1. A condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to the same causes.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure.
4. The failure of a physiologic system.
5. The falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure, for example, collapse of the lung.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

/col·lapse/ (kah-laps´)
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse  shock (2).

collapse

[kəlaps′]
Etymology: L, collabi, to fall together
1
Usage notes: nontechnical.
a state of extreme depression or a condition of complete exhaustion caused by physical or psychosomatic problems.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by shock.
3 the abnormal sagging of an organ or the obliteration of its cavity.
Psychology A popular term for a complete mental breakdown
Public health An accident involving the loss of an industrial or domestic building or structure’s integrity

collapse

A state of extreme prostration and depression, with circulatory failure. See Volitional collapse.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. A condition of extreme prostration.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure or the failure of a physiologic system.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

An abrupt failure of health, strength or psychological fortitude. The term is used more by the laity than by the medical profession.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. Condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to same causes.
2. State of profound physical depression.
3. Failure of a physiologic system.
4. Falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse,

n a state of extreme prostration and depression with failure of circulation; abnormal falling in of the walls of any part or organ; with reference to a lung, an airless or fatal state of all or part of the lung.

collapse

1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse
shock; circulatory insufficiency without congestive heart failure.
lung collapse
References in periodicals archive ?
Another contributor to airway collapsibility may be related to difference in the growth of the larynx in males and female during puberty.
15 g is able to cause loess disasters, including seismic landslides, seismic collapsibility, and liquidation of saturated loess mass.
Figure 6 shows that slab and top wood pulps have a lower tensile resistance and this may be related to the fact that those pulps have thick-walled fibers and consequently a lower collapsibility.
The SmartCrate's collapsibility was the reason Veg Pro selected it rather than purchase more FlapNest totes for shipment to customers.
This collapsibility is a significant issue in cystic fibrosis because of the accumulation of thick and sticky secretions in the airways caused by the defect in CFTR.
6,315,434, claims to cover many different types of collapsibility, including mechanisms used by other suppliers.
The absence of a distinct plateau for 1E/2EHA may reflect its higher density, which would limit the collapsibility of the foam structure and limit the length of the plateau region.
Wood offers better product protection, less repairs, collapsibility and can suit an array of products under virtually any distribution system.
The collapsibility of the ULD with a 14:1 to 20:1 return ratio helps to solve the air cargo industry's imbalance problem.
This helps assure maximum rigidity, a powerful gripping force, a large collapsibility range, and superior accuracy.
Advantages of the plywood IBC system are its collapsibility and low capital expense.
For instance, statisticians (Whitemore, 1978; Giles & Lepage, 1986) suggest the loglinear modeling's collapsibility rules can be used for solving two major problems frequently encountered in analyzing contingency tables: