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collapse

 [kŏ-laps´]
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.
circulatory collapse shock (def. 2).

col·lapse

(kō-laps'),
1. A condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to the same causes.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure.
4. The failure of a physiologic system.
5. The falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure, for example, collapse of the lung.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

/col·lapse/ (kah-laps´)
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse  shock (2).

collapse

[kəlaps′]
Etymology: L, collabi, to fall together
1
Usage notes: nontechnical.
a state of extreme depression or a condition of complete exhaustion caused by physical or psychosomatic problems.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by shock.
3 the abnormal sagging of an organ or the obliteration of its cavity.
Psychology A popular term for a complete mental breakdown
Public health An accident involving the loss of an industrial or domestic building or structure’s integrity

collapse

A state of extreme prostration and depression, with circulatory failure. See Volitional collapse.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. A condition of extreme prostration.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure or the failure of a physiologic system.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

An abrupt failure of health, strength or psychological fortitude. The term is used more by the laity than by the medical profession.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. Condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to same causes.
2. State of profound physical depression.
3. Failure of a physiologic system.
4. Falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse,

n a state of extreme prostration and depression with failure of circulation; abnormal falling in of the walls of any part or organ; with reference to a lung, an airless or fatal state of all or part of the lung.

collapse

1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse
shock; circulatory insufficiency without congestive heart failure.
lung collapse
References in periodicals archive ?
Pastor in charge of the church, Temitope Joshua, attributed the cause of the collapse to a mysterious helicopter flying repeatedly over the building.
Residential building collapse is a common phenomenon in Egypt.
We find that both the Wave Function Collapse and the Schrodinger's Cat Thought Experiment are not real scientific topics but only pure fictions.
The city council report states: "The collapse occurred without visible or audible warning to the occupants of the garage and was sudden.
Farrell said this is the first collapse in Bolton he was aware of, and that Fire Chief John Stephenson had commented that since he joined the department 40 years ago there had never been a roof collapse in Bolton.
A HUDDERSFIELD builder has appeared in court in connection with the collapse of a building in Elland.
Three others were killed in another building collapse in Qalyoub, some 20 kilometres (13 miles) north of Cairo.
She demonstrates how the government failed to mobilize the population with its discourse of sacrifice, which instead brought about a social disintegration of the Viennese home front and ultimately the collapse of the city.
In the intermediate and longer term, infrastructural collapses may diminish the shackles of deepest deprivation.
More than 100 bridges and overpasses in Los Angeles County remain vulnerable to collapse in a major earthquake, even as the state nears completion of a $2.
It is not a question open for debate whether the collapses of past societies have modern parallels and offer any lessons to us," he declares.
Building collapses are common in Egypt, often caused by shoddy construction