cold

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cold

 [kold]
2. a relatively low temperature; the lack of heat. A total absence of heat is absolute zero, at which all molecular motion ceases. See also hypothermia and frostbite.
3. low in physiological activity.
4. low in radioactivity.
common cold see common cold.

cold

(kōld),
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature noticeably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
See also: acute rhinitis, coryza.
2. Popular term for a viral infection involving the upper respiratory tract and characterized by congestion of the nasal mucous membrane, watery nasal rhinorrhea, and general malaise, with a duration of 3-5 days.
See also: acute rhinitis, coryza.
3. Completely devoid of, or containing an insignificant amount of, a radioactive nuclide.
Synonym(s): frigid (1)

cold

psychrophobia.

cold

(kōld)
1. low in temperature, in physiological activity, or in radioactivity.
2. common cold; a catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral, a mixed infection, or an allergic reaction, and marked by acute rhinitis, slight temperature rise, and chilly sensations.

common cold  cold (2).

cold

(kōld)
adj. colder, coldest
1.
a. Having a low temperature: cold water.
b. Being at a temperature that is less than what is required or what is normal: cold oatmeal.
c. Chilled by refrigeration or ice: cold beer.
2.
a. Feeling no warmth; uncomfortably chilled: We were cold sitting by the drafty windows.
b. Appearing to be dead; unconscious: found him out cold on the floor.
c. Dead: was cold in his grave.
3.
a. Not affectionate or friendly; aloof: a cold person; a cold nod.
b. Exhibiting or feeling no enthusiasm: a cold audience; a cold response to the new play; a concert that left me cold.
c. Devoid of sexual desire; frigid.
n.
1.
a. Relative lack of warmth: Cold slows down chemical reactions.
b. The sensation resulting from lack of warmth; chill.
2. A condition of low air temperature; cold weather: went out into the cold and got a chill.
3. A viral infection characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the upper respiratory passages and usually accompanied by malaise, fever, chills, coughing, and sneezing. Also called common cold, coryza.

cold′ly adv.
cold′ness n.

cold

Etymology: AS, kald
1 adj, the absence of heat.
2 n, a contagious viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, usually caused by a strain of rhinovirus. It is characterized by rhinitis, tearing, low-grade fever, and malaise and is treated symptomatically with rest, mild analgesia, decongestants, and increased fluid intake. Also called common cold.
3 adj, a distant method of relating; not friendly.

COLD

[kōld]
abbreviation for chronic obstructive lung disease. See chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

cold

Common cold, see there.

cold

(kōld)
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature notably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
2. Popular term for a virus infection involving the upper respiratory tract and characterized by congestion of the mucosa, watery nasal discharge, and general malaise, with a duration of 3-5 days.
See also: rhinitis
Synonym(s): common cold, frigid (1) , upper respiratory infection, upper respiratory tract infection.

cold

An inflammation of the nose and throat lining caused by one of more than 200 different kinds of viruses. Infection is by touch rather than by droplet inhalation and virus access is often via the CONJUNCTIVA. The medical term is coryza.

cold

topical, therapeutic application of cold; inducing local vasoconstriction, reduced inflammation, decreased vascular permeability, increased blood viscosity and reduced swelling; topical cold (e.g. cold compresses or ice; see RICE(P)) used in initial treatment of strains and sprains and other acute inflammatory states; contraindicated in infection, poor peripheral circulation or cardiovascular disease, Raynaud's or peripheral neuropathy

cold

(kōld)
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature noticeably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
2. Popular term for viral infection involving upper respiratory tract.

COLD

chronic obstructive lung disease. See chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

cold

1. an acute disease of the upper respiratory tract characterized by cough, sneezing, running at the eyes and nose and mild fever, similar to the common cold of humans, occurring in captive primates.
2. a relatively low temperature; the lack of heat. A total absence of heat is absolute zero, at which all molecular motion ceases. See also hypothermia.

cold acclimation
short-term adjustments to carbohydrate and fat metabolism in response to exposure to low environmental temperatures.
cold acclimatization
heat production is not increased, but heat loss is reduced by changes in haircoat and vascular supply to the skin.
cold applications
the primary effect of cold on the surface of the body is constriction of the blood vessels. Cold also causes contraction of the involuntary muscles of the skin. These actions result in a reduced blood supply to the skin and produce a marked pallor. If cold is prolonged there may be damage to the tissues because of the decreased blood supply.
The secondary effects of cold are the opposite of its primary action. There is increased cell activity, dilatation of the blood vessels, and increased sensitivity of the nerve endings.
cold barn
see cold housing (below).
cold cow syndrome
see shock.
cold-enrichment
a procedure that promotes growth of some bacteria during laboratory isolation. Suspensions of specimens are held at refrigerator temperatures for extended periods before being cultured. Recommended for recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from neural listeriosis and Yersinia spp.
cold exposure
cold hemagglutinin disease
see cold agglutinin disease.
cold housing
thin-walled, uninsulated barns with no central heating.
cold injury
includes hypothermia and frostbite.
cold-nosed
refers to a hound which is able to follow a cold (very old) scent.
cold receptors
receptors in the skin which are sensitive to low temperatures.
cold rooms
walk-in refrigerator; temperature used varies with material stored, e.g. meat needs 32°F to 45°F (0°C to 7°C), offal needs less than 28°F (−2°C).
cold-shoeing
fitting a horseshoe without heating it in a forge and shaping it exactly to the foot. See also shoeing.
cold shortening
shrinkage of meat when temperature is excessively low in early stages of chilling.
cold steel surgery
that using unheated cutting instruments; the normal surgical procedure in contrast to electrosurgery or cryosurgery.
cold storage
for meat to be stored for more than 72 hours the chilling temperature should be between 30°F and 23°F (−1 and −5°C) and the humidity less than 90%.
cold store taint
cut lean surfaces of chilled meat are covered with a brown slime and have a sour smell caused by growth of the bacteria Achromobacter spp.
cold stress
occurs at temperatures less than 50°F (10°C), varying with chill factor, wetness, protection from wind.
cold therapy
see cryosurgery, therapeutic hypothermia.
cold tray
the container used for immersion of instruments in a cold sterilization solution, usually with a rack that allows instruments to be lifted above the fluid level to drain before use.
cold water hemolytic anemia
see cold anemia.

Patient discussion about cold

Q. what vitamins are recommended for treating cold? and what is the right amount of it ?

A. Actually, although studied in trials, vitamins C, E and zinc wasn't found to have a substantial effect either preventing or relieving the symptoms of common cold, so currently these vitamins can't be recommended for the treatment of common cold.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/commoncold.html

Q. I think I caught a cold :( My throat is sore, and I keep snivel all the time. Is there anything I can do to in order to relieve the bad feeling?

A. Go to a GOOD health food store and buy Oil of Oregano capsules; take one a day. Also get Source, "Welness Formula". Take as directed, 3, every 3 hours. Drink LOTS and LOTS of water! NO Dairy and no sugar! You'll be fine in a day! :)

Q. Do Antibiotics cure a cold? I have a cold and a runny nose, should I take Antibiotics?

A. Taking antbiotics when you only have a cold can harm your chances of the effectiveness of using antibiotics when you have a severe problem. Your body can build up an immunity to antibiotics so it is only recommended to take them when your immune system can't fight off the infections. Most of the time, a cold just needs to run it's course , so drinking plenty of fluids and resting can allow your body to rejuvinate and fight the cold. To help prevent colds and viruses, look for products that help to maintain a good immune system like vitamin C. Aloe juice is another good product for your immune system. When we deal with stress and don't get enough rest, we cause havoc on our immune system, so prevention can be the best thing to do. Wishing you well!

More discussions about cold
References in periodicals archive ?
He said priests should be conscious of the "gift of grace placed in their hands" in the confessional and should offer penitents "the charity of a kind welcome, without being selfish with [their] time and without harshness or coldness.
In support of that claim, he and colleagues will describe in the March Nature Neuroscience how the actions of multiple, unspecified ion channels allow sensory nerve cells to react to coldness.
Since our political system--bipartisan in its coldness to human rights--imposes a silence on these issues, it cannot be respected.
he suffers from her coldness or from her rejection of his love;
His passionate love affair with the wife of Victor Hugo, celebrated in the love lyrics of Le Livre d'amour (1843), engendered a certain coldness between the poet and the young critic.
Educate employees on symptoms of cold-related stresses: heavy shivering, uncomfortable coldness, severe fatigue, drowsiness, and/or euphoria.
ASTORE -- The high prices of wood timber have irked people in the wake of increased coldness and intermittent snowfall received by upper areas of Astore during recent days.
We will go to Serbia and be faced with players who have a coldness about them.
HEATHER BLAIR, Wallsend My Father ALWAYS wanted to tell you I loved you Then look into your sad empty eyes For some kind of reaction I wanted to touch you hold you But your coldness kept us apart Sleep was the only relief for your troubled mind, You spent your whole life searching For something you would never find .
The pair part because Michelle can't understand Steve's coldness towards her - and he won't explain.
mosquito nets and twelve-inch guns, the coldness of dress whites thrown
He said coldness was still and people should use proper dresses as the summer season was to come yet.