cold pressor test

cold pres·sor test

a cardiocirculatory challenge conventionally performed by immersing one hand in ice-cold water for two or more minutes (as tolerated) to acutely raise the blood pressure, thus imposing resistance to ejection of blood from the left ventricle into the systemic arterial system and consequently acutely increased afterload (afterload = increased left ventricular wall stress).
Synonym(s): Hines-Brown test

cold pressor test

A test that measures blood pressure and heart rate response to the immersion of one hand in ice water.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmacodynamic parameters such as heart rate, augmentation pressure, augmentation index (Alx), subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR), radial and aortic blood pressure (BP) were recorded before and after the cold pressor test at baseline and at the end of treatment.
2011) Autoregulation in the ocular and cerebral arteries during the cold pressor test and handgrip exercise.
In order to show the cohesive flow of data, A-B-A phase lines are not displayed before and after the cold pressor test condition; however, Figure 4 shows that the two classes containing more than one function grouped the following variables: (a) Class 1: all three cardiac measures, together with two TEOAE measures (A-B and 3 kHz response amplitude) and (b) Class 2: three TEOAE measures (response, X response, 1 kHz response amplitude).
Electrodermal and microcirculatory activity in patients with fibromyalgia during baseline, acoustic stimulation and cold pressor tests.
Vasospasm was not observed with hyperventilation-induced respiratory alkalosis or the cold pressor test.
In contrast, blood flow during the cold pressor test in smokers was lower than that in nonsmokers.
During the physical stress tests, called a Cold Pressor test, results in the control group revealed that systolic blood pressure increased by 27 percent, while diastolic blood pressure increased by 31 percent.
More specifically, we presented participants with a psychological biathlon consisting of the cold pressor test as well as a perceptual-motor task designed to induce unwanted sensations, such as disorientation and nausea.
The data presentations at AAPM show that NKTR-181 produced a clear dose-dependent analgesic response in a cold pressor test, a model of pain used in healthy subjects to measure CNS analgesic activity.
They also underwent a cold pressor test in which changes in plasma cortisol were measured in response to placement of the nondominant hand in a bucket of ice water for 2 minutes.