cold compress


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cold compress

Etymology: AS, kald + L, comprimere, to press together
a pad of damp, thickly folded, soft absorbent cloth, dipped into cold water, wrung out, and applied to a body part for the relief of pain or reduction of inflammation or as a comfort measure.

cold compress

Naturopathy
A cloth imbibed with ice-cold water applied locally to relieve pain, stop bleeding and decrease congestion and swelling caused by acute local trauma.

Orthopedics
CCs are usually applied intermittently to acutely injured muscle, joints or bone up to 48 hours after the initial trauma.

cold compress

Orthopedics CCs are usually applied intermittently to acutely injured muscle, joints or bone, up to 48 hrs after the initial trauma

cold compress

A soft, absorbent cloth, several layers thick, dipped in cold water, slightly wrung out, and applied to the part being treated. The duration of the application is usually 10 to 20 min.
See also: compress
References in periodicals archive ?
Place a cold compress on the site for at least 10 minutes to reduce the swelling.
Or put it in the freezer and use it as a cold compress.
The packet can be refrigerated - a nice touch for those looking for a cold compress - and the cloth cover can be removed and tossed into the washing machine.
I would have thought the excruciating combination of hot wax and rapid removal would have had most blokes screaming for an anaesthetic, a cold compress and some counselling for post-traumatic stress disorder.
You can also try holding a cool or cold compress against your skin (press, donOt rub).
5 litres of cherry stones and can also be wrapped in a plastic bag and put in the freezer to become a perfect cold compress for sports injuries, bumps, sprains and puffy eyes.
Unless you get a severe reaction, clean the wound and apply a cold compress, ice cube or sting-relief treatment.
Also, use a cold compress on the injured area outside of the mouth for ten minutes on and ten minutes off.
Wash children with cool water several times a day, particularly on the face and back of neck, or keep a wet flannel in the fridge to use as a cold compress.
Rubbing the painful muscle or applying a cold compress can also help get rid of muscle cramps
Another trick is to fill a balloon with water and freeze it overnight then use it as a cold compress that will help shrink the haemorrhoid and ease the discomfort.