cold agglutination

cold ag·glu·ti·na·tion

agglutination of red blood cells by their own serum (see autoagglutination), or by any other serum when the blood is cooled below body temperature, but most pronounced below 25°C; the phenomenon results from cold agglutinins; may be seen occasionally in the blood of apparently normal people or as a pathologic finding in patients with primary atypical pneumonia, infectious mononucleosis, and other viral diseases, certain protozoan infections, or lymphoproliferative neoplasms. See: autoagglutination.

cold ag·glu·ti·na·tion

(kōld ă-glū'ti-nā'shŭn)
Clumping of red blood cells by their own serum, or by any other serum when the blood is cooled below body temperature; seen occasionally in the blood of normal people or as a pathologic finding in mycoplasmal pneumonia, infectious mononucleosis, certain protozoan infections, or lymphoproliferative neoplasms.
See: autoagglutination
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For automated CBC, EDTA sample may be kept at room temperature; keeping at 4[degrees]C may preserve the sample longer, but this may induce other problems such as cold agglutination.
15) Several methods were utilized for detection of this pathogen, including cold agglutination test, (16) serological methods (Mycoplasma IgM antibody, complement fixation, ELISA) (17,18) and microparticle agglutination test.
However, lack of sensitivity and specificity rendered cold agglutination irrelevant for diagnosis (21).