cohort


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Related to cohort: Cohort study, Cohort Analysis

cohort

 [ko´hort]
in research and statistics, a group of individuals who share a characteristic at some specific time and who are then followed forward in time, with data being collected at one or more suitable intervals. The most common use of the term is to describe a birth cohort, in which all the group members are born in a specified time period, but other common characteristics could define the cohort, such as marriage date, exposure to an infectious agent, or date of diagnosis or of treatment for a disease.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt),
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epidemiologic cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

/co·hort/ (ko´hort)
1. in epidemiology, a group of individuals sharing a common characteristic and observed over time in the group.
2. a taxonomic category approximately equivalent to a division, order, or suborder in various systems of classification.

cohort

[kō′hôrt]
Etymology: L, cohortem, large group
(in statistics) a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as members of the same age or the same sex.

cohort

EBM
A subgroup of a population with a common feature, usually age (e.g., all persons in the UK born in 1964 form a birth cohort).

Social medicine
A group of persons born at about the same time who share common historical or cultural experiences.

Trials
A group of persons or animals of the same species with a common characteristic, set of characteristics, or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study.

cohort

Clinical trials A group of persons with a common characteristic, set of characteristics or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study. See Birth cohort, Cluster, Inception cohort.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epide miological cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

A group of persons all born on the same day. Cohort studies are valuable in medical and epidemiological research.

cohort

a group of organisms in a population all of which are the same age.

cohort

defined population or group sharing a common factor
  • birth cohort group of children born at a similar time, and studied prospectively throughout life

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
Designated group followed or traced over a period.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort,

n in statistics, a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as the same age or sex.
cohort study,
n a scientific study that focuses on a specific subpopulation, such as children born on a certain date in a specific environment.

cohort

in epidemiology a group of individuals who share a characteristic acquired at the same time. The term usually refers to a birth cohort, which contains animals born in a specified time period.

cohort studies
a prospective or follow-up, analytical, epidemiological study. The investigation identifies a group of animals which have the hypothesized cause and which are free of the disease of interest, and a comparison group of animals which are free of the hypothesized cause. Both groups, the cohorts, are followed over time to determine the incidence rates of the disease in question in each of the two groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
YouAppi OneRun now has the ability to attribute users to cohorts based on their usage behavior and patterns.
The probability of cirrhosis was approximately 1% with birth cohort screening and treating all positive patients, 7% with birth cohort screening and treatment based on staging, 55%-60% with the risk-based strategies, and 67% with no screening.
An interesting way to characterize within cohort heterogeneity is to use an "intellectual Lorenz curve" to quantify the inequality of contributions in each cohort to the aggregate flow of peer-review publications.
Figure 2 shows the variation in rates by cohort, with an increase in rates particularly before age 50.
Three classes prior to the end of the Spring Semester, one candidate raised the point that perhaps the cohort should consider gathering materials not for "themselves," but for the schools in which they were interning.
The rest of this article tracks the cohort of about 2,600 Silicon Valley companies born in 2000 from that year through the final quarter of 2009.
Members of the School of Intercultural Studies' first cohort have now completed their dissertations.
Some proteges in the first cohort have also collaborated in other activities.
wish to compare the wage distribution for the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1979 cohort in their forties with the likely wage distribution for the NLSY 1997 cohort (which like our later cohorts has not yet entered the labour market) at the same age.
We now proceed to examine the age-gender and cohort effects in the LFP rates of different demographic groups on the aggregate LFP rate.
The cohort studies document that higher toenail Se concentration correlated with less incidence of T2DM.
METHODS: Birth cohort studies were included if they a) collected data on at least one environmental exposure, b) started enrollment during pregnancy or at birth, c) included at least one follow-up point after birth, d) included at least 200 mother-child pairs, and e) were based in a European country.