cohesiveness


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cohesiveness

[kōhē′sivnəs]
Etymology: L, cohaerere, to cling together
1 (in psychiatry) a force that attracts members to a group and causes them to remain in it.
2 (in dentistry) a property of annealed pure gold that allows it to fuse together under pressure and to closely adapt to the walls of a tooth preparation, making possible the use of 24-carat gold sheets or pellets as dental restorative material in single-tooth restorations.
3 the property of the forces of attraction within an object that holds it together as compared to adhesion which is the forces of attraction existing between two different objects or surfaces that hold them together.
References in periodicals archive ?
2]: High group cohesiveness would stimulate a greater impulsive tendency to purchase sports team-licensed merchandise than low group cohesiveness.
Attraction to group membership, cohesiveness, is a function of the balance between the costs and the benefits of membership (Thibaut & Kelley, 1959).
A challenge for counselors at this stage is to help the group retain its cohesiveness, its sense of identity, and its focus on task accomplishment until the moment that the campers board the buses to go home.
For example, when forming groups in the classroom, the lecturer can follow the key principles for group formation provided above; that is, ensure an even distribution of student assets in each group and avoid barriers to group cohesiveness.
The superimposed ragtime piano music, played by David Shephard, gives the film cohesiveness.
The publisher has reorganized the talks for cohesiveness and convenience.
Family conditions with respect to divorce and family cohesiveness.
One explanation for this variance in effects could be differences between group cohesiveness across agencies.
Two vital organizations have united to breathe new life into a mission that focuses on high quality standards and a vision that seeks to bring cohesiveness to a fragmented marketplace.
9) and a lower mean score on the scale measuring perceived neighborhood support and cohesiveness (-0.
Such an integrated mix of activities once characterized traditional cities and is being promoted today under the banner of the "New Urbanism," a movement that also recognizes the value of good design in creating both lively variety and reassuring cohesiveness in American cities.