cohesion

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cohesion

 [ko-he´zhun]
the intermolecular attractive force causing various particles of a single material to unite. adj., adj cohe´sive.

co·he·sion

(kō-hē'zhŭn),
The attraction between molecules or masses that holds them together.
[L. co-haereo, pp. -haesus, to stick together]

cohesion

/co·he·sion/ (ko-he´zhun) the intermolecular attractive force causing various particles of a single material to unite.cohe´sive

co·he·sion

(kō-hē'zhŭn)
The attraction between molecules or masses that holds them together.
[L. co-haereo, pp. -haesus, to stick together]

cohesion

the attraction of identical molecules for each other.

co·he·sion

(kō-hē'zhŭn)
The attraction between molecules that holds them together.
[L. co-haereo, pp. -haesus, to stick together]

cohesion (kōhē´zhən),

the ability of a material to adhere to itself.

cohesion

the force causing various particles to unite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many guidelines for object-oriented systems make use of coupling and cohesion as indexes to help construct good design [8], but two criticisms may be applied to current cohesion and coupling metrics.
The cohesion of E is defined by the following formula (Formula (1)) for n > 1
Cohesion values are therefore between 0 (no links between classes) and 1 (every class linked to all others by a link of maximal weight).
If no assumption is made on the nature of components and on the nature of links, cohesion and coupling measure the same thing, namely the strength of the relationships between the components.
The coupling of the subjects of the system S is obtained by calculating the cohesion of the set of components resulting from the procedure described above, and by using the value of Wmax as defined above.
A decomposition quality metric, inspired by the works of Karimi and Kosynski [7] is now defined, as the difference between the cohesion of the elements and their coupling (Formula 2):