cohere


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cohere

[kōhir′]
Etymology: L, cohaerere, to cling together
to stick together, as similar molecules of a common substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Cohere, we want to create brands that are compelling to the people living in these cities, and help spur more positive change throughout the city through these projects, said Richards.
My story doesn't have to cohere completely to be useful.
In a demonstration in Santa Clara, California, Cohere achieved 1.
The porous character of Vertera Spine s biomaterial facilitates integration of bone tissue with the company s COHERE Cervical Interbody Fusion Device.
But the outcome is less like one of its character's novels than a series of sketches that tax neither the intellect nor the nervous system, and barely cohere into a feature-length narrative.
This "National Innovation System should define participants, cohere policy, funding, priority, collaboration, and outcomes" and set the agenda for the innovation inputs of talent, training, and infrastructure.
She has selected sixty-three disparate items (each a chapter heading) to cohere her narrative, although often the connection of such objects to the plot is very slight.
Shipboard, monumental increments cohere, making disassembly
1 said that Cohere Ltd, holder of more than 95% of the shares of the Company's common equity, filed a petition in Curacao Court seeking to allow it to acquire all the issued shares not held by Cohere, at US$21.
The Good Shepherd'' is made up of many parts that individually are quite fascinating, yet don't cohere, for the most part, in a gripping way.
By now, Leipzig's Hochschule fur Grafik und Buchkunst's prize pupil's signature style is well known: the exquisite painterly composition of scenes that refuse to cohere in space or time; busy details that open out into echoing voids; recurrent characters or archetypes (the worker, the farmer, the soldier) that seem utterly detached from one another; drab or lurid color applied in a manner ranging from grand to stolid to whimsical all on the same canvas; and an imposing catalogue of influences (Bruegel, Delacroix, David, Max Beckmann, Max Ernst, Balthus, Sigmar Polke, Gerhard Richter, Martin Kippenberger) overridden by a Soviet-era socialist realism perhaps too readily dismissed as merely ironic.