cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, one-fifth (21 per cent) of cohabiters report a separation of individual incomes, and a further 43 per cent have some separate and some combined income.
Similarly, cohabiters are more likely to keep their income separate (20 per cent) than are married respondents (six per cent) (Figure 1).
However cohabiters are more likely than married people to have their incomes totally separate, and a substantial proportion keep some income separate and have some income combined.
Although cohabiters are much more likely than married people to organise their income by keeping some separately and having some combined, we do not find, as Singh and Lindsay (1996) do, that most cohabiters organise their money this way.
6%, 30% higher than sample 1 estimates, and of the same magnitude for cohabiters, indicating that married and cohabiting men earn the same wage premium--as long as they stay with their partners
With so many alternative motivations, it is difficult to justify treating all cohabiters the same.
They more closely resembled cohabiting than married men; they were younger, less educated, and less employed than married fathers and similar to cohabiters on these variables.
Resident parents are more advantaged than parents who live apart, and among resident parents married parents are more advantaged than cohabiters (demographic characteristics of the father sample by relationship group are reported in Appendix B; patterns by group are parallel to those for the full sample).
In turn, cohabiters reported having a great deal of influence in greater proportions than fathers who are friends or in no relationship with the mother but in equal proportions to boyfriends.
In many studies of domestic labour, cohabitation and marriage are assumed to be similar and cohabiters are not separated from marrieds for analysis (see Bittman 1992, Delphy and Leonard 1992, Dempsey 1997, Baxter and Western 1998).
Addressing some of the gaps in the literature the first part of this paper uses both qualitative and quantitative data to document the diverse ways in which young Australian cohabiters divide domestic labour between them.
The cohabiters were interviewed as couples and then individually in 1993 and a year later in 1994 individual follow-up interviews were held.