cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
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References in periodicals archive ?
12) When cohabitation alone without any other control variables was considered, the greater risk of marital separation of couples who cohabited prior to marriage than couples who did not cohabit was 11% for those who married in the 1970s and only 2% for those who married in the early 1990s.
This analysis shows that, of the ever-partnered population aged over 15, 20 percent have, at some point, cohabited for at least three months (Table 1).
Among the total 72 patients from both groups who used barrier contraception, preeclampsia occurred nearly seven times more often in women who had cohabited with their partners for less than 4 months, compared with those cohabiting for a year or more.
Both the marital and cohabiting wage differentials are statistically significant with currently married men earning about 22% more and currently cohabiting men earning about 13% more than the base group of men who have never married or cohabited.
Although the book was not overtly gay, the undercurrents of homoeroticism were unmistakable as the vampires Lestat and Louis scampered about the globe devoting special attentions to their exsanguinations of young men and eventually cohabited in a nontraditional living arrangement that included the child vampire Claudia.
Sure, everyone knows that if you deny the sacraments to enough young men and women who have cohabited, then everyone else will stop cohabiting, right?
In a random sample of 947 individuals, 60 percent of couples who had been married five years or less reported that they had cohabited before marriage (Stanley and Markman, 1997).
Through the use of the term "survivor," Bill C-78 proposes to extend pension survivor benefits to married couples, and/or couples who cohabited in "a relationship of a conjugal nature" for at least one year before the death of the pension plan contributor.