cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sweet, and Andrew Cherlin (1991) "The role of cohabitation in declining rates of marriage".
The new Family Code might have not recognised cohabitation as equal to marriage but it did introduce changes to ease divorce and the adoption of children.
However since the period of pre-marital cohabitation is included as belonging to the marriage duration, this would only occur if the couple had children but were not cohabiting, and later married and had one or more additional children.
adults under 50 having spent some time living together with their spouse before marriage, cohabitation holds possibly important implications for the future of marriage and child rearing.
Finally, while there is little evidence that fatherhood influences wages in the United States, it may be the case that becoming a father is a more significant turning point in the lives of Danish men than either marriage or cohabitation.
Does homosexual cohabitation require similar protection?
Recent focus groups of young Catholic adults on "problematic aspects of church teaching" found that they disagreed with church teaching on premarital sex and cohabitation and do not see a fundamental difference in a loving relationship before and after a wedding.
Modes of cohabitation between women and men varied, as did the assigned meanings of these relationships by villagers, townspeople, nobles, and commoners, and church and state authorities.
A second project examines the interrelationships between fatherhood role transitions and transitions in other life roles such as completion of education, beginning full-time employment, cohabitation, and marriage.
But if they bought a sofa together or something was a gift to both, they might need to hammer it out between them - or draw up a list and include it in a cohabitation agreement.
Cohabitation has long been recognized as a basis for seeking the modification and/or termination of an alimony obligation.
OTTAWA -- Cohabitation and marriage are not equivalent unless accompanied by equivalent levels of commitment, fidelity and stability, all of which are far more often lacking in cohabiting relationships, York University professor Anne-Marie Ambert claims in her paper Cohabitation and Marriage: How Are They Related?