cognitive neuroscience

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cognitive neuroscience

n.
The branch of neuroscience that deals with the way neurological mechanisms are involved in thinking and behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cognitive neuroscientist Dr Sarah Blakemore, from University College London, said even older people should be encouraged to try something new.
Mark Jung-Beeman, a cognitive neuroscientist at Northwestern University, showed that distinct brain areas contribute when people solve problems with insight, that is, when solutions are accompanied by "Aha" moments.
Robert Stickgold, a cognitive neuroscientist specializing in sleep research at Harvard University said, "We are living in the middle of history's greatest experiment in sleep deprivation.
Research was carried out at Muncaster Castle, in Cumbria, reputedly one of Britain's most haunted castles, by Dr Jason Braithwaite, a cognitive neuroscientist from the Behavioural Brain Sciences Centre at Birmingham University, and Maurice Townsend, from the Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena.
Last spring, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in collaboration with Stansilas Dehaene, a well-known French cognitive neuroscientist, used brain imaging techniques to determine how the brain processes various mathematical problems.
a cognitive neuroscientist associated with the pioneering program in learning disabilities at Northwestern University, makes the important point that none of the biological methods yields data interpretable without a model of cognition and language based on paradigms in which individuals process incoming information from the environment.
Moreover, there is some confusion as to the credentials required to be regarded as a card-carrying cognitive neuroscientist.
Overall, this suggests multiple different routes in the brain to a common endpoint of the experience of fear," says cognitive neuroscientist Stephan Hamann of Emory University in Atlanta.
Scott Weems, a cognitive neuroscientist, argues that laughing is an involuntary reaction to our resolution of a cognitive conflict.
Such is the research finding of Katerina Fotopoulou, formidablytitled Cognitive Neuroscientist at University College, London, and who am I to argue with her?
Professor Sophie Scott, Wellcome Trust Senior Fellow at University College London (UCL), stand-up comedian and cognitive neuroscientist also gave a lecture.
Janina Seubert, a cognitive neuroscientist said that odor pleasantness and facial attractiveness integrate into one joint emotional evaluation and this may indicate a common site of neural processing in the brain.
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