cognitive growth


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cognitive growth

Growth shown by the progressive maturation of thought, reasoning, and intellect, esp. in school-aged children.
See also: growth
References in periodicals archive ?
Such an image enables us to design different types of learning activities (teaching, learning and evaluation activities) that shall facilitate the cognitive growth and development of these students.
95) tells how early childhood teachers, administrators and parents can understand the latest brain research and how it translates into educational strategies to foster cognitive growth.
Items from Cognitive Growth Fostering include, "Caregiver uses both verbal description and modeling simultaneously in teaching any part of the task" and "Caregiver focuses attention and child's attention on the task.
Psychologists often refer to these early years as a sensitive period because a child's early environment has a direct influence on cognitive growth and development (Nelson 2000a and 2000b).
At this point it is important to clarify the similarities and differences between liminality and developmentalist theories such as Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive growth, particularly as it is interpreted and implemented in school instruction.
Chapters include: adolescents in social context; adolescents in theoretical context; adolescents in ethnic context; sexual maturation and physical growth; body image; traditional views of cognitive growth -- Piaget and Elkind; intelligence, information processing, and decision making; self-concept, identity, ethnicity, and gender; sexual values, behavior, and education; adolescent society, culture, and subculture; social development, relationships, dating, nonmarital cohabitation, and marriage; development of moral judgment, character, values, beliefs, and behavior; adolescents and their families; divorced, parent-absent, and blended families; education and school; work and vocation; adolescent alienation; and substance abuse, addiction, and dependency.
They are particularly well-suited for kids with disabilities as tools for both motor skills and cognitive growth.
Baker and Gerler (2001) noted that the goal of developmental guidance is "to promote emotional, social, and cognitive growth while preventing problems in the lives of young people" (p.

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