coevolution

(redirected from coevolutionary)
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co·ev·o·lu·tion

(kō'ev-ō-lū'shŭn),
The process whereby genes or gene fragments are changing together and not diverging.

coevolution

(kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən, -ē-və-)
n.
The process by which two or more interacting species evolve together, each changing as a result of changes in the other or others. It occurs, for example, between predators and prey and between insects and the flowers that they pollinate.

co′ev·o·lu′tion·ar·y adj.
co′e·volve′ (-ĭ-vŏlv′) v.

coevolution

the evolution of unrelated organisms that has taken place together because of the special link between them, e.g. insects and the flowers they pollinate (see ENTOMOPHILY), parasites and their host, members of a symbiotic relationship (see SYMBIOSIS). The ARUM LILY is a notable example, attracting small flies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of detectable disease and limited histopathologic effects on these animals contrast dramatically with the severe disease and histopathologic changes observed in other laboratory rodents and humans, and support their role as reservoir hosts with a long-term coevolutionary relationship to VEEV.
Studies in species other than bats have examined host-virus phylogeny and identified coevolutionary relationships (13-16) or incongruous phylogenetic patterns (17).
leucopus-associated viruses (Blue River) suggests that this coevolutionary relationship is not absolute and that some species jumping (host-switching) may also have occurred.
Host-parasite coevolutionary relationships in two assemblages of pocket gophers and chewing lice.
Although cheatgrass seeds are also cached in this manner, this introduced plant does not share a coevolutionary history with North American desert rodents.
In the first chapter of Molecular evolution and adaptive radiation (MEAR), Givnish outlines alternatives to adaptive radiation (non-adaptive, developmental, sexual, and coevolutionary radiations) and demonstrates how the study of adaptive radiation provides insight into adaptation, speciation, biogeography, and historical ecology.
1997a,b), by which the same B polymorphism may pass through successive selfish and near-neutral stages as a consequence of a coevolutionary arms race with the A chromosomes.
These represent two different coevolutionary paths for these host/parasite relationships.
This antagonistic relationship could result in a coevolutionary process whereby an adaptation in the plant species is followed by an adaptation in the herbivore species, and vice versa (Ehrlich & Raven, 1964).
Coevolutionary race continues: butterfly larval adaptation to plant trichomes.
Disruptive selection on vulnerability has been shown to be capable of generating cycles in the context of coevolutionary models (Abrams and Matsuda 1997).