coevolution


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Related to coevolution: antagonistic coevolution

co·ev·o·lu·tion

(kō'ev-ō-lū'shŭn),
The process whereby genes or gene fragments are changing together and not diverging.

coevolution

(kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən, -ē-və-)
n.
The process by which two or more interacting species evolve together, each changing as a result of changes in the other or others. It occurs, for example, between predators and prey and between insects and the flowers that they pollinate.

co′ev·o·lu′tion·ar·y adj.
co′e·volve′ (-ĭ-vŏlv′) v.

coevolution

the evolution of unrelated organisms that has taken place together because of the special link between them, e.g. insects and the flowers they pollinate (see ENTOMOPHILY), parasites and their host, members of a symbiotic relationship (see SYMBIOSIS). The ARUM LILY is a notable example, attracting small flies.
References in periodicals archive ?
In it, they concluded that coevolution - the interactions occurring between different types of organisms without genetic exchange - is one of the main reasons for diversity of life on Earth, and proposed the mechanism whereby this process might lead to the immense variety of plant and insect species.
In this article, we explore the coevolution of regime complexes and national policy coherence in the context of biodiversity governance.
While coevolution explains why humans can experience drugs, it doesn't explain why humans choose to use drugs despite social stigma against them.
In particular, they propose that research attend to the coevolution of teacher learning.
The architecture of this network developed from a coevolution of genes and of genetic structures that were progressively conditioned to shield against translation and replication errors.
Because frugivory and pollination mutualisms are characterized by diffuse, asymmetric networks, proponents of the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution (Jordano et al.
Coevolution theory is drawn upon to conceptualise how the interaction and dynamics of perceptions of uncertainty and assessments of risk during the internationalisation process might be developed theoretically.
In reality bioeconomic examples abound in nature; such biological processes as evolution, coevolution and cooperation; natural selection, conservation; regeneration and recycling and many others are all bioeconomic; that is, although they might have originally developed only as biological but through time they have attained economic purpose and importance too.
Pages 313-336 in Parasitic birds and their hosts: Studies in coevolution (Rothstein, S.
Nerkar A, 1999, "On the Complexity of Technological Evolution: Exploring Coevolution within and across Hierarchical Levels in Optical Disc Technology," In Variations in Organization Science: In Honor of D.