coercion

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Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future, or the use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric—e.g., child psychiatry—or treatment of substance abuse

coercion

Public safety Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future or use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric–eg, child psychiatry, or treatment of substance abuse
References in periodicals archive ?
32) This realization of the potential imposition and costs of a system of laws enforced by coercion introduces the language of justice, which is the subjective determination that any net coercion used in a property conflict was necessary as meeting some valued goal, and will be further developed in section IV below.
According to the action theory of property there is yet no problem in this formulation, as there has been no coercion used to enforce a property regime.
The action theory offers at least a standard by which potential conflicts can be resolved in attempting to minimize or eliminate coercion amongst the conflicting actors.
In fact, some libertarian theorists have wrestled with the difference between coercion and aggression, but a measure of net-coercion was not forthcoming.
The action theory of property helps to illustrate those aspects of each that are merits and those that are flaws, notably where coercive action is taken or advised to an extent greater than the existing coercion to resolve conflicts or enforce property regimes.
When an actor observes net coercion in a conflict, he may make the judgment to intervene to defend the integrity of the coerced party, but this itself a coercive act.