coenzyme


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coenzyme

 [ko-en´zīm]
an organic molecule, usually containing phosphorus and some vitamins, sometimes separable from the enzyme protein; a coenzyme and an apoenzyme must unite in order to function (as a holoenzyme).
coenzyme A a coenzyme essential for carbohydrate and fat metabolism; among its constituents are pantothenic acid and a terminal SH group, which forms linkages with various acids, e.g., acetic acid (acetyl CoA) and fatty acids (acyl CoA); abbreviated CoA.
coenzyme Q any of a group of related quinones occurring in the lipid fraction of mitochondria and serving, along with the cytochromes, as an intermediate in electron transport; they are similar in structure and function to vitamin K1.

co·en·zyme (Co),

(kō-en'zīm),
A substance (excluding solo metal ions) that enhances or is necessary for the action of enzymes; coenzymes are of smaller molecular size than the enzymes themselves, are dialyzable and relatively heat-stable, and are usually easily dissociable from the protein portion of the enzyme; several vitamins are coenzyme precursors.
Synonym(s): cofactor (1)

coenzyme

/co·en·zyme/ (ko-en´zīm) an organic nonprotein molecule, frequently a phosphorylated derivative of a water-soluble vitamin, that binds with the protein molecule (apoenzyme) to form the active enzyme (holoenzyme).
coenzyme A  a coenzyme containing among its constituents pantothenic acid and a terminal thiol group that forms high-energy thioester linkages with various acids, e.g., acetic acid (acetyl CoA) and fatty acids (acyl CoA); these thioesters play a central role in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the transfer of acetyl groups, and the oxidation of fatty acids. Abbreviated CoA and CoA-SH.
coenzyme Q , coenzyme Q10 ubiquinone.

coenzyme

(kō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An organic substance that reversibly combines with a specific protein, the apoenzyme, and with a substrate to form an active enzyme system.

co′en·zy·mat′ic (-zə-măt′ĭk) adj.
co·en′zy·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

coenzyme

[kō·en′zīm]
Etymology: L, cum, together with, en, in, zyme, ferment
a nonprotein substance that combines with an apoenzyme to form a complete enzyme or holoenzyme. Coenzymes include some of the vitamins, such as B1 and B2, and have smaller molecules than enzymes. Coenzymes are dialyzable and heat-stable and usually dissociate readily from the protein portions of the enzymes with which they combine. See also acetylcoenzyme A.

co·en·zyme

(kō-en'zīm)
A substance (excluding solo metal ions) that enhances or is necessary for the action of enzymes; coenzymes are of smaller molecular size than the enzymes themselves; several vitamins are coenzyme precursors.
Synonym(s): cofactor (1) .

coenzyme

an organic COFACTOR molecule smaller than protein that bonds with a specific ENZYME while the reaction is being catalysed. Like enzymes, coenzymes are not altered or used up in the reaction and can be used many times, but a minimal quantity is required for normal level of enzyme function and thus normal health. This explains why VITAMINS, which often act as coenzymes, are so essential. See also ACETYLCOENZYME A.

Coenzyme

A substance needed by enzymes to produce many of the reactions in energy and protein metabolism in the body.
Mentioned in: Beriberi

coenzyme

substance enhancing or necessary for enzyme action, not part of the enzyme

coenzyme,

n an essential nonprotein component (such as a vitamin or a mineral) of an enzyme.

co·en·zyme

(kō-en'zīm)
A substance (excluding solo metal ions) that enhances or is necessary for the action of enzymes; coenzymes are of smaller molecular size than the enzymes themselves; several vitamins are coenzyme precursors.

coenzyme (kōen´zīm),

n a nonprotein substance, such as a B-complex vitamin, that combines with enzymes to assist in the catabolic process.

coenzyme

an organic molecule, usually containing phosphorus and some vitamins, often separable from the enzyme protein but essential as a cosubstrate in catalysis; a coenzyme and an apoenzyme must unite in order to function (as a holoenzyme).

coenzyme A
essential for carbohydrate and fat metabolism; among its constituents are pantothenic acid and a terminal SH group, which forms thioester linkages with various acids, e.g. acetic acid (acetyl-CoA) and fatty acids (acyl-CoA); abbreviated CoA.
coenzyme A acetoacetyl
coenzyme A acetyl
coenzyme Q
any of a group of related quinones with isoprenoid units in the side chains (the ubiquinones), occurring in the lipid fraction of mitochondria and serving, along with the cytochromes, as an intermediate in electron transport; they are similar in structure to vitamin K1.
coenzyme R
see biotin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perspectives on therapy of cardiovascular diseases with coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone).
2012): Olive oil supplemented with Coenzyme Q10: Effect on plasma and lipoprotein oxidative status.
Coenzyme Q10 is a vitamin-like substance, a powerful antioxidant and moisturiser which works by speeding up cell repair.
The researchers concluded that there was insufficient evidence to prove the etiologic role of coenzyme Q10 deficiency in statin-associated myopathy.
The fine chemicals business of Asahi Kasei Pharma, which performs the production and sale of coenzyme Q10, has thus been placed in a position of continuing unprofitability.
Research shows coenzyme Q10 does not affect the cholesterol lowering effect of statins, so taking both will be no problem.
The greatest value of Coenzyme Q10 may be for congestive heart failure patients," says Ishwarlal Jialal, director of the Laboratory for Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Research at the University of California, Davis.
Coenzyme Q10 is an important nutrient found in the mitochondria of every cell in our body and has three specific functions: energy production, immune system support and anti-oxidation.
The Department of Defense has funded a study performed at the University of California, San Diego to assess whether Coenzyme Q10, an over-the-counter nutritional supplement, may benefit affected veterans.
Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a vitamin (vitamin Q10) that, along with vitamin B6, has been found to be low in people with cancer.
The Atkins Diet Center recommends the following supplements for high blood pressure: vitamins Be and B5, potassium, coenzyme [Q.
Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally occurring hydrophobic substance that is involved in electron transfer across the mitochondrial membrane from the NADH dehydrogenase complex and the succinate-Q reductase complex to cytochrome c (Cephalalgia 2002;22:137-41).