friction

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Related to coefficient of friction: coefficient of kinetic friction

friction

 [frik´shun]
the act of rubbing.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn),
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction

/fric·tion/ (frik´shun)
1. the act of rubbing.
2. massage using a circular or back-and-forth rubbing movement, used especially for massage of deep tissues.

friction

[frik′shən]
Etymology: L, fricare, to rub
1 the act of rubbing one object against another. See also attrition.
2 a type of massage in which deeper tissues are stroked or rubbed, usually through strong circular movements of the hand. See also massage.
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Friction massage

friction

A soft tissue massage technique, which entails the use of small circular pressure strokes from the fingertips, thumb pads and palms, with the intent of mobilising stiff joints and enhancing the circulation of blood to tendons and ligaments.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
3. A group of movements in massage intended to move superficial layers over deeper structures, to reach deeper tissues, or to create heat. Includes static, cross-fiber, with-fiber, and circular frictions.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction

the force between the surfaces of two objects in contact, at least one of which is moving (or tending to move) relative to the other. kinetic friction friction due to motion of one object relative to another; also known as dynamic friction. coefficient of friction dimensionless (no units) number representing friction between two bodies or objects. Calculated as the force parallel to the object or surface (tangential force) divided by the force perpendicular to the object or surface (normal force).

friction

surface force generated by movement or potential movement of body part at a surface interface; generates heat and impedes movement of body part relative to the interface; friction forces resist actual or potential sliding of one object against another; heat generated by friction at skin surfaces promotes increased metabolic rate of local epidermis, and callus formation

friction,

n massage technique that uses superficial tissue to engage deeper layers. Friction increases circulation and fibroblast activity.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction,

n the resistance to movement as one object is moved across the other, usually creating heat.

friction

the act of rubbing.

friction coefficient
see friction coefficient.
friction injury
caused most commonly by automobile trauma in dogs and cats in which the animal has been dragged along the road or pavement, causing avulsion of tissue, from skin through to ligaments, tendons, muscles and bone. See also friction burn.
friction rub
sound heard on auscultation caused by rubbing together of two inflamed surfaces, e.g. pleuritic friction rub. See also pleural friction rub.
References in periodicals archive ?
Static coefficient of friction values for laminated strand lumber range from 0.
The initial peak force provides the static coefficient of friction, and the subsequent average force provides the dynamic coefficient of friction.
Frictional heat dissipation at the interface is directly proportional to pressure, coefficient of friction, and the velocity (3).
The measurements of coefficient of friction for each of the four different lubricants were carried out by using the ringcompression test.
Crodamide lubricant additives used to reduce the coefficient of friction, improve mold flow, and mold release in PE, PP, PET, PS, PVC, nylon, and other specialty engineering resins.
Other improvements include greater coefficient of friction than non-grit coatings, ease of cleaning, floor strength, improved lighting, decreased forklift tire wear and tear, decreased drag on cleaning equipment, all without volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nor plant shutdowns.
Thus, creating a bump on the road reduces at the same time the coefficient of friction between pneumatics and road surface.
MoldWiz INT-33VPE is composed entirely of vegetable-based organic materials, and is said to be an ideal additive for enhancing flow and reducing the surface coefficient of friction in polyolefins and styrenic resins without adversely affecting secondary operations of molded parts, according to the company.
A new proprietary technology reportedly can produce TPU resins having a very low coefficient of friction (COF) without any lubricants, waxes, or fillers that cause blooming or reduce transparency.
Versollan provides a soft touch, high coefficient of friction, and flexible "rubbery" feel; it also has a dull, matte finish, rubber look.
The polished surface of the aluminum cutters significantly reduces the coefficient of friction for drilling at elevated speeds and feeds, improving efficiency and productivity.
The company also manufactures friction measurement devices typically used by airports to measure the coefficient of friction of runways.

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