code


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Related to code: Morse code, zip code

code

(kōd),
1. A set of rules, principles, or ethics.
2. Any system devised to convey information or facilitate communication.
3. Term used in hospitals to describe an emergency requiring situation-trained members of the staff, such as a cardiopulmonary resuscitation team, or the signal to summon such a team.
4. A numeric system for ordering and classifying information, for example, about diagnostic categories.
[L. codex, book]

code

(kōd)
1. a set of rules for regulating conduct.
2. a system by which information can be communicated.

genetic code  the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome governing transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e., determining the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell.
triplet code  codon.

code

(kōd)
n.
1. Genetics The genetic code.
2. Medicine Code blue.
3. Slang A patient whose heart has stopped beating, as in cardiac arrest.
v. coded, coding, codes
v.tr.
To assign a code to (something) for identification or classification: coded each response to the survey by age and gender.
v.intr.
1. Genetics
a. To specify the genetic code for an amino acid or a polypeptide: a gene that codes for an enzyme.
b. To specify the genetic code for a trait or characteristic: a gene that codes for red hair.
2. Slang To go into cardiac arrest.

code

Etymology: L, caudex, book
1 (in law) a published body of statutes, such as a civil code.
2 a collection of standards and rules of behavior, such as a dress code.
3 a symbolic means of representing information for communication or transfer, such as a genetic code.
4 a system of notation that allows information to be transmitted rapidly, such as Morse code, or in secrecy, such as a cryptographic code.
5
Usage notes: informal.
a discreet signal used to summon a special team to resuscitate a patient, as in "Code zero, 3 west" announced over a public address system to summon the team to the west wing of the third floor without alarming patients or visitors. "To code" means to cease respirations and/or heart function. See also no code.
6 to enter data by use of a given programming language into a computer. Compare decode, encode.
Emergency care True code noun A widely used, highly popular term for
(1) A cardiopulmonary arrest or other emergency requiring resuscitation and a coordinated all-hands-on-deck response on the part of medical personnel
(2) A call for personnel over the hospital’s PA system to respond to such an emergency
verb To suffer a cardiac arrest in a hospital environment
Ethics A set of rules or principles
Genetics See Genetic code
Informatics The set of programmed instructions that tells a computer to do something
Managed care A system for classifying medical or surgical procedures for payment by third-party payers
Vox populi A system for organizing large amounts of information, in which each block of data is designated by an alphanumeric

code

noun Emergency care True code A widely used, highly popular term for
1. A cardiopulmonary arrest or other emergency requiring resuscitation, or.
2. A call for personnel over the hospital's PA system to respond to such an emergency. See Failed code, Slow code Ethics A set of rules or principles. See Code of Hammurabi, Nuremburg code, Hunter-killer code Managed care A system for classifying medical or surgical procedures for payment by third-party payers. See A code, Activity code, Barcode, -GB code, J code, K code, NBG code, Uniform billing code, V code Vox populi A system for organizing large amounts of information, in which each block of data is designated by an alphanumeric. See Barcode. verb To suffer a cardiac arrest in a hospital environment.

code

(kōd)
1. A set of rules, principles, or ethics.
2. Any system devised to convey information or facilitate communication.
3. Term used in hospitals to describe an emergency situation requiring trained members of the staff, such as a cardiopulmonary resuscitation team, or the signal to summon such a team.
4. A numeric system for ordering and classifying information (e.g., about diagnostic categories).
5. To assign an alphanumeric combination to a diagnosis or procedure.
See also: NATO code
[L. codex, book]

code

(kōd)
1. Any system devised to convey information or facilitate communication.
2. A numeric system for ordering and classifying information.
[L. codex, book]

code,

n 1. a system of recording information by symbols so that only selected people will know the meaning. Used also to conserve space.
2. a systematic statement.
code of ethics,
n a series of principles used as a guide in assisting a dental professional to fulfill the moral obligations of professional dental practice.

code

1. a set of rules governing one's conduct. Called also ethical code.
2. a system by which information can be communicated.
3. a set of alphabetical or numerical markers which are an index to a much larger bank of information.

code of ethics
see code of ethics.
genetic code
the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome that governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e. determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. See also genetic code.
code of practice/conduct
a document produced by an authoritative body to provide a guide to people in their conduct relative to, for example, animal welfare, or their practice, for example, in the housing and feeding of pigs. It is the sort of document that is used when testing in a practical situation rules which are planned to be included in subsequent legislation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the online code underneath each child's picture, you can order copies of the photo.
It describes the advantages of multiple groups working on code to provide more innovation and faster debugging cycles, discussed primarily in terms of the Linux operating system.
Within a few years, coding theorists realized that a slightly modified version of an old, obscure code could sometimes produce even better results.
With each method, parts are given a unique code using a pre-encoded stencil or mold, which are made either on-site or by Perma-Code.
Anyone with a smart code can immediately pay money online, receive money (including from credit cards or any other means provided by the smart-code server), use the code's control center on the Web to change any' of dozens or hundreds of options, and create any number of new children codes (with those options) to give or sell to others.
It seems that some subcontractors, like those in the plumbing and steamfitting industries, would like to see the National Fire Protection Association NFPA 5000 Building Construction and Safety Code adopted, whereas those in the architectural design and construction management industries are backing the International Building Code.
AHIMA also argues ICD-9 doesn't meet the requirements for code set standards stipulated by HIPAA or the characteristics of a procedural coding system outlined by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics.
By classifying more situations as Code 3 - an emergency requiring immediate action - authorities say they could get help to the scene sooner and shorten average response times in the process.
1) If the applicant's race was identified as Hispanic (code 4) in 2003, use code 1 (Hispanic or Latino) for reporting ethnicity.
The new tool, part of Green Hills' MULTI and AdaMULTI Integrated Development Environments (IDE), significantly enhances the reliability of embedded software by enabling developers to test 100% of their code.
Code intricacies aside, building design can prove crucial to the integrity of a structure and the safety of its residents in the event of a fire.
However, an exam ination of the way honor was written about in other texts of the period allows for some general conclusions regarding the evolution of the honor code and Shakespeare's role in representing and defining that code.